Pure Bud Silver Strands

Pure Bud Silver Strands
Pure Bud Silver Strands

Yunnan “Pure Bud Silver Strands” First Flush Green Tea, 2019 from @yunnan_sourcing.

“We have offered the “Silver Strands” 银丝 varietal green tea (a robust one leaf to one bud ratio) since 2005, but decided to also offer its first flush tippy “pure bud” counterpart.  Picked in the earliest part of spring (in Late-February) before the spring rains arrive, this pure bud pluck features small hairy silver tips with no leaf.”

Yunnan Sourcing

Darker green flavors, but with a minty aftertaste.

Expected this to be light, but those light flavors are pretty meaty/umami/mushroom in nature. Very little sweetness. Kept the water on the cool side, respecting the buds.

Aside from a bit of mint, not a lot of length, nor that strong for re-steeps.

A solid light tea, if you like them on the meaty side of green.

#Tea #Cha #YunnanTea #YunnanSourcing #PureBudSilverStrands #DrinkTea #TeaEnthusiast

Yunnan “Jade Snail”

Yunnan “Jade Snail” Green Tea from Mojiang, 2019, via @yunnan_sourcing.

“This “Jade Snail” 玉螺 green tea is a tippy one leaf to one bud pick but because it’s such and early spring tea the leaf is typically quite small.  The result is a balanced green tea with both robust and sweet attributes.”

Yunnan Sourcing

Thick body, light flavor.

The early flavors and scents are on the greener side, reminiscent of asparagus, but it’s a savory tea whose lingering grain-ish sweetness expresses itself the finish, rather than the early flavors.

There’s a little mid-tongue bitterness, that I can sense more than actually taste.

Just enough to keep it interesting.

Somehow, there is a lingering after-taste evoking dried fruit.

For a tea that seems simple and lightly flavored at first taste, it is surprisingly complex as the steeps progress.

Not bad resteepability for a green tea and thought provoking length.

Nice.

#Tea #GreenTea #JadeSnail #YunnanTea #YunnanSourcing #GreenTeaOfMojiang

“Bao Hong” Green Tea

Bao Hong Green Tea

Early Spring Yunnan “Bao Hong” Dragonwell Green Tea, 2019 via @yunnan_sourcing.

“”Bao Hong” tea is from Yi Liang county of Yunnan.  It’s leaf is quite small and it carries a high level of aroma.  The leaves are always picked when very small and fresh during a two hour window of time in the early morning of mid-February.    The aroma is intense and fresh.”

In the method of picking and processing, this is quite similar to Long Jing Dragon Well tea. If you looked at a basket of the dry leaves, I wouldn’t be surprised if you mistook it for a high quality Long Jing Dragon Well tea. That is, until you brewed a cup.

While it looks a bit like Dragon Well tea from Long Jing, the flavor of the tea is very distinct from it.

Green teas tend to fall along light and dark flavor families, lighter green flavors like asparagus and tarragon vs darker, meatier flavors like collard greens and seaweed.

While still super fresh, it is a 2019 first flush tea after all, this is on the darker side of the green tea spectrum, at least for bud heavy, spring teas.

There’s something in the flavors that is super familiar to me, but that I can’t quite place. It’s not an off or bitter flavor, it’s just a bit unusual in a tea for me.

My coworker described the aftertaste as a bit like the soft drink “Sprite”. I haven’t had Sprite for years, but I feel like I remember it was heavier on the lime than the lemon. And I kind of get that, there’s a bit of the sort of dark lime-like flavor which lingers on the palate, lightened by a sparkle of darker spearmint.

If you’re tired of the usual green tea suspects, the Bao Hong Green Tea is an interesting one to try to wrap your mind around.

#GreenTea #Cha #Tea #YunnanTea #YunnanSourcing #BaoHong #BaoHongTea

Huangshan Maofeng

Huangshan Maofeng has strong buds

Huangshan Maofeng has strong buds from Yin Xiang Hua Xia tea.

Huangshan Maofeng is another green tea almost always included in lists of “Big 10 Famous Chinese Teas” (十大中国名茶)”.

My notes are, “light grassy vegetal flavor evocative of green beans or asparagus with a camphor/pine aftertaste.”

This is a super elegant and light green tea, more vegetal than fruity, almost no bitterness or grip to speak of.

The English translation of the name is “Yellow Mountain Fur Peak”, due to the “small white hairs which cover the leaves and the shape of the processed leaves which is said to resemble the peak of a mountain”.

The recommended way to brew tippy green teas like this is to add a small amount (say 1g per 100ml water) to a tall, preferable tempered, water glass and cover with hot (185F/85C) water. Then wait and watch the dance as the liquid cools and the tea leaves drop to the bottom of the glass. Then, as your glass gets down half way, add more water until the liquid tastes more like water than tea. The only downside to this method is it is not as fast as brewing with a gaiwan, it enforces a leisurely contemplative pace to your tea drinking. Or maybe it is an upside? You also tend to end up eating a few tea leaves, which isn’t really a bad thing.⁣

#Tea #Cha #GreenTea #DrinkTea #YinXiangHuaXiaTea #HuangshanMaofeng

Anji Bai Cha

First off, the name of this tea is a little misleading, it is called “Anji Bai Cha” which means “White Tea of Anji”, but the production method is that of a Green Tea. It is called “White Tea”, because the tea buds and leaf sprouts are very light in color, pale yellow to white.

Second, because of the light color of the leaves, it is sometimes called “Golden Buds” which might lead you to think it is a “Yellow Tea”, but again, this is just referring to the color of the buds, not the production method.

Finally, the color of the tea soup, because of the light green of the leaves, is bright topaz yellow. Again, not because it is a Yellow Tea, but because of the light color of the chlorophyll in the leaves and buds. It is a green tea.

If you research Anji Bai Cha, another thing you will find quickly are health claims related to the teas’ relatively high amounts of Amino Acids.

“Bai Cha’s pale jade leaves are unique in their high amino acid content, which contributes to the sweetness and calming effect of their infusion. Some studies have estimated that the Bai Cha leaves contain approximately three to five times the amount of amino acid found in any other green tea.”

Seven Cups

Another interesting point is that the two bushes which were found with the light buds characteristic of Anji Bai Cha, and from which all cuttings of Anji Bai Cha were taken, were only discovered in 1982! Anji Bai Cha, from Anji, is still a relatively lightly produced and thus somewhat prized and thus expensive tea.

Anji Bai Cha Green Tea of Zhejiang, 2018, via Yunnan Sourcing.

Anji Bai Cha Green Tea of Zhejiang

6g in 120ml Gaiwan, water at 185F/85C.

The first time I tried the Yunnan Sourcing Anji Bai Cha, it freaked me out a bit. I may have been a bit on the high side of that temp. Brewed in a Gaiwan, I found the flavor of the Yunnan Sourcing Anji Bai Cha almost too intense. There is a creamy umami core to Anji Bai Cha that I somehow concentrated with my preparation, the flavor reminded me a bit of hard boiled egg, or Chinese 100 year old eggs. Brewed as I did, there was a bit of bitterness in the aftertaste.

anjibaicha golden buds via Yin Xiang Hua Xia Tea.

Anji Bai Cha Golden Bud

6g in 120ml Gaiwan, water at 185F/85C.

The Yin Xiang Hua Xia Tea anjibaicha golden buds was a much less intense flavor. While the umami/eggy core is still there, it was less intense and the flavor more balanced. There is a lasting sweet impression and length of flavor that is more apparent with this Anji Bai Cha than the other two. You usually don’t think so much about length of flavor with Green Teas, but this anjibaicha has a haunting and very pleasant after taste.

Ming Qian An Ji Bai Cha Organic, 2018, via Seven Cups.

Ming Qian An Ji Bai Cha

2g in 12oz insulated Glass Cup, water just starting to come to simmer, should be around 185F.

The “Ming Qian” in the name of this importer’s Anji Bai Cha, means that the tea was picked before the “Qing Ming” festival in early April. Basically, this just means it is from the first flush of tea buds, not the secondary buds later in the spring. For what it is worth, all three of these teas are first flush.

The most common way to drink bud heavy green teas like Anji Bai Cha or Dragon Well is to steep them in a clear glass, using about 1g of tea per 100ml of water.

This is a relaxing way to drink tea, you have to wait for the leaves to drop to the bottom of the glass, or at least start to drop. While you’re waiting for them to drop, you can watch the ballet of the leaves as they float down through the water. Once you start drinking, you just add a bit more hot water as you drink down your glass. You can keep adding hot water until your tea tastes more like hot water than tea.

I made the Seven Cups tea first this way, but also went back and tried all three teas this way.

All three Anji Bai Chas were good.

The Yunnan Sourcing Anji Bai Cha is the most intense in its flavor and was a bit tricky to brew in a gaiwan. It’s flavor was good when prepared in a glass.

The Seven Cups Anji Bai Cha was in the middle of the three, not as intense as the Yunnan Sourcing, but not as elegant as the Yin Xiang Hua Xia Tea.

The Yin Xiang Hua Xia Tea was the most elegant and had the best length of flavor. I found myself thinking about the flavor most of the day after drinking it, craving it a bit. But, it is also the most expensive of the three. (They also sell lower priced types that more or less map out to exactly the same prices as Yunnan Sourcing or Seven Cups.)

If you are interested in Anji Bai Cha, I might recommend trying a less expensive version, but be aware that it may be a bit trickier to get a good cup of tea out of it than with the smoother, higher grade.

#Cha #Tea #DrinkTea #TeaOfInstagram #GreenTea #AnjiGreenTea #AnjiBaiCha #YunnanSourcing #YunnanSourcingTea #YinXiangHuaXia Tea #SevenCupsChineseTea #SevenCupsTea

Xinyang Mao Jian Green Tea of Henan

Xinyang Mao Jian Green Tea of Henan

Imperial Xinyang Mao Jian Green Tea of Henan, Spring 2018 via @yunnan_sourcing.

Mao Jian Green Tea is another sometimes included in lists of “Big 10 Famous Chinese Teas” (十大中国名茶)”.

Imperial Xinyang Mao Jian is a bit similar to Bi Luo Chun from Suzhou, really tiny buds. Seriously, look at this teeny bud!

Xinyang Mao Jian Green Tea of Henan

The main visual difference in the tea form from Bi Luo Chun being the Bi Luo Chun is twisted twice to give it the snail shape, while the Xinyang Mao Jian is only twisted once.

Clean, bright flavors of sweet grass. Thick soup. Not as nutty as Dragonwell or Bi Luo Chun, more of a leafy, meaty, green flavor.

My coworker described it as, “oaty and flowery at the same time”. He also declared it his favorite tea I’ve made for him so far. I don’t know if I’d go quite that far, but it is very, very good.

#Tea #Cha #GreenTea #YunnanSourcing #XinyangMaoJian #MaoJian #HenanTea #ChineseTea #DrinkTea

Fancy Grade Bi Luo Chun

Certified Organic “Fancy Grade Bi Luo Chun”

Certified Organic “Fancy Grade Bi Luo Chun”, Spring 2018 from @yunnan_sourcing.

“This is a classic “Robust” style Yunnan Bi Luo Chun (rolled) Green Tea, with a mix of 2 leaf to 1 bud plucking style.”

Yunnan Sourcing

Which is to say, you won’t mistake Yunnan Bi Luo Chun for the classic ethereal Bi Luo Chun from Jiangsu known for its tiny buds. These leaves abd buds are hearty Yunnan-style, some of them are downright huge.

This is a hearty green tea with a thick soup and pleasant outgoing vegetal character. It is relatively forgiving of careless brewing, but rewards care, exposing layers of green flavor in the main tastes and mint in the aftertaste. Gongfu style brewing, this tea will stand up to several steeps and just keep on going.

It is a great, organic, reasonably priced, perfect tea for an every day green tea drinker.

#Cha #Tea #OrganicTea #GreenTea #BiLuoChun #YunnanTea #YunnanSourcing

“Long Tang Gu Shu” Old Arbor Raw Pu-erh Tea Cake

2018 @yunnan_sourcing “Long Tang Gu Shu” Old Arbor Raw Pu-erh Tea Cake.

“We are proud to invite you to experience our first ever production from Long Tan Village (龙塘 Dragon Pool)!  Long Tang village is a small village in the northern part of Jinggu county at an altitude of 1500 meters…Our Spring 2018 production is from tea gardens of two families and is picked from 80-200 year old tea trees.  The total production for both families being around 50 kilograms.”

Yunnan Sourcing

The flavor is deceptively mild for a young raw/sheng Pu-erh. Flavor is clean, but on the savory/briney side, with a very long aftertaste reminiscent of certain incense. There is a bit of appetizing tannic grip which you can sense on your tongue after drinking the tea, but little bitterness.

Given the mild, clean character of the tea, there is quite a lot of complexity to turn over in your mind as you drink. I can only think it will get more interesting as it ages. And, who can resist a tea from “Dragon Pool”?

Very strong, clear, chest based buzz (cha qi).

#Cha #Tea #PuerhTea #YunnanSourcing #DrinkTea #PuerhCha #RawPuerh #ShengPuerh

no. 2 rougui

No. 2 rougoui from @white2tea.

The last of the seven Wuyi Yancha samples from the white2tea January tea club.

“The name rougui literally translates as cinnamon, one of the most famous varieties of yancha [rock oolong].  From early May 2018, this tea had four roasts, but the flavors of the flame have receded by the time of its release to reveal the flavors and aromas of dark fruits and deep mineral character within the tea.”

white2tea

Punching slightly above my weight class with this Oolong.

As I’ve only tried these seven Wuyi Oolong in my life, I’m at a bit of a loss as where to start with this exceptional tea.

Also, I’m a bit emotionally traumatized by listening to Scott Walker’s album “The Drift” on the way home from work.

It’s a tea that does reward careful drinking and preparation, turning over the different aspects of the flavor and scent in your mind as you savor it, and as it evolves through the course of a gong fu session. The roast character, the mineral character, the fruit, and the long lasting sweet aftertaste.

#Cha #Tea #WuyiYancha #white2tea #Oolong #RockOolong #DrinkTea #GongFuCha

Spice Flower

Spice Flower from @white2tea.

“Spice Flower is an oolong tea from the Fujian province of China. Roasted to a medium light level, the floral sweetness and spicy character of this tea shines through the roasted character.”

white2tea

Some times when I taste a tea, I kind of wonder if I have the right one.

In the case of white2tea’s spice flower, I am totally wondering if the bag was mis-labelled or if my taste is just off today.

To me, the roast is totally dominant, especially in the early steeps. I get the creamy/milky character described in the tasting notes, and in later steeps, it does seem quite sweet in character, with a lingering floral, light character. It does seem less oxidized than some of the other white2tea Wuyi Yancha.

The lingering scent in the share cup reminds me a bit of watermelon and soft berries.

I gave a cup to my coworker and he described its primary character and flavor as “ash”.

So, I dunno. The problem with single dose samples is you only get one chance to brew and if you screw it up, there are no second chances.

The buzz is on the zippy side and it is a very tasty tea. It just doesn’t seem to match the description.

#Cha #Tea #White2Tea #WuyiOolong #WuyiYancha #RockOolong #DrinkTea #Oolong