2017-06-14 Lá Vem a Morte

Lá Vem a Morte by Boogarins.

Brazilian samba run through a psychedelic dub blender. Very cool. Ends up reminding me a bit of My Bloody Valentine. Sad I missed their show at The Chapel last week. Another release courtesy of the exotic music explorations of the wonderful Michele K-Tel.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #Boogarins #LáVemAMorte

2017-06-13 Another Helpful Medicine

Another Helpful Medicine by Aurochs.

Toronto based Aurochs are a keyboard, bass, drums, and “electronics” quartet. The songs on this album are arranged as a continuous track. Minimal, atmospheric Jazz which occasionally breaks into a groove. I like how they take the time to develop moods and themes.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #Aurochs #AurochsMusic #AliBerkok #PeteJohnson #JakeOelrichs #MikeSmith

2017-06-12 Adelante

Adelante by Han Bennink Trio.

A mix of original tunes, a standard, a handful of Mengelberg pieces, and some improvisations, Adelante has a familiar feel, even on it’s most “out” sections. Toldham and Badenhorst are both very tuneful players. Overall, a pleasing album, if occasionally a bit bland.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #HanBennink #JoachimBadenhorst #SimonToldham

129 – Spirit of God

Please turn your hymnals to number 129 and join with the Saxophones in, “Spirit of God”.

Number: 129
First Line: Spirit of God
Name: MORECAMBE.
Meter: 10 10, 10 10.
Tempo: With reverence
Music: Ascribed to Frederick Cook Atkinson, 1841-97
Text: George Croly, 1780-1860

Saxophone Arrangement: 129-SpiritOfGod

This is a very familiar sounding hymn! Maybe the most familiar sounding of any of the Pentecost hymns.

MORECAMBE was composed in 1870 by Frederick C. Atkinson (b. Norwich, England, 1841; d. East Dereham, England, 1896) as a setting for Henry Lyte’s “Abide with Me” (442). It was first published in G. S. Barrett and E.J. Hopkins’s Congregational Church Hymnal (1887). The tune is named for a coastal town on Morecambe Bay near Lancaster, England, a town not far from Bradford, where Atkinson served as organist.

As a boy Atkinson was a chorister and assistant organist at Norwich Cathedral. In 1867 he graduated with a Bachelor of Music degree from Cambridge and then served as organist and choirmaster in St. Luke’s Church, Manningham, Bradford. He also held that position at Norwich Cathedral and at St. Mary’s Parish Church in Lewisham. Atkinson wrote hymn tunes, anthems, and complete Anglican services, as well as songs and piano pieces.

MORECAMBE has a good melodic contour and a strong rise to its climax but then concludes rather weakly. (See comments on the generic group of tunes that includes MORECAMBE at PHH 276.) Try singing this fervent prayer to MORESTEAD (295), a tune with a very different character that will shed new light on the text.

Psalter Hymnal Handbook, 1988

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

128 – Lord, Let Thy Spirit

Please turn your hymnals to number 128 and join with the saxophones in,”Lord, Let Thy Spirit”.

Number: 128
First Line: Lord, Let Thy Spirit
Name: BERGGREN (ALT.).
Meter: 12 10, 11 10.
Tempo: Serenely
Music: Andreas Peter Berggren, 1801-80
Text: Valdimar Briem, 1848-1930

Clarinet Arrangement: 128-LordLetThySpirit

After mixing 8 saxes for the last hymn, I decided 4 saxophones was plenty!

Anyway, this is quite a pleasant, if somewhat plain, hymn.

Andreas Peter Berggren (March 2, 1801 – November 8, 1880) was a Danish composer, organist, and pedagogue.

Berggreen was born and died in Copenhagen. He initially studied law before pursuing a career in music, studying under Christopher Ernst Friedrich Weyse. In addition to Weyse, Berggreen was also heavily influenced by the German musician Johann Abraham Peter Schulz.

Berggreen was the organist at Trinitatis Church in Copenhagen from 1838 and taught singing at Metropolitanskolen from 1843. In 1859 he was appointed a song inspector by the Danish government.

Apart from several pieces of incidental music, a cantata, solo piano works, and songs, he published the folk song collections Melodier til Salmebog (1853) and Folk Sange og Melodier (1842–71). The latter comprises eleven large volumes, and includes folk songs in Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, German, English, French and Italian (Russian folk songs are also represented but in German translation).

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

2017-06-09 The Damage is Done

The Damage is Done by McPhee/Brötzmann/Kessler/Zerang.

An early tendency towards noir jazz, encouraged by Mr Kessler’s bass lines, leads towards some pleasantly lyrical passages from Brötzmann. However, when McPhee switches to Tenor, about 20 minutes in, the take-no-prisoners, two Tenor skronk-fest you were hoping for materializes. Invigorating.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #JoeMcPhee #PeterBrötzmann #KentKessler #MichaelZerang

2017-07-08 What If/They Both/Could Fly

What If/They Both/Could Fly by Evan Parker and Joe McPhee.

Evan Parker on Tenor Sax in duet with Joe McPhee on Pocket Trumpet and Soprano Sax. A diverse and enjoyable set of free improvisation duos from two masters of the form.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #EvanParker #JoeMcPhee #RuneGrammofon

2017-06-07 A Scarcity of Miracles

A Scarcity of Miracles, a Krimson Projekt.

Since I’m going to see King Crimson in a couple weeks, I thought I should check in on what they are up to. Predictable key changes, inane lyrics delivered in an an overly sincere manner, sub-Kenny G lite-jazz Soprano Sax, and a modicum of Frippertronics. Thinking I should have listened to their recent output BEFORE buying a ticket. The price of nostalgia.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #KrimsonProjekt #AScarcityOfMiracles #KingCrimson-ish #RobertFripp

127 – Come, Gracious Spirit

Please turn your hymnals to number 127 and join with the saxophones on, “Come, Gracious Spirit”.

Number: 127
First Line: Come, Gracious Spirit
Name: WAREHAM.
Meter: In moderate time
Music: William Knapp, 1698-1768
Text: Simon Browne, 1680-1732

127-ComeGraciousSpirit

Bass clarinet is in the shop for some work, so for a week, or so, it’s going to be Saxophone Hymns! Some arranging and recording challenges, as they are louder and don’t quite have the same range as clarinets, but it will be a good chance to practice more Sax.

The one-hit wonder of ‘Wareham’ – William Knapp

Dorset has its own ‘Shrubsolian composer’ – what the pop music world would call a ‘one-hit wonder’. His name is William Knapp, and his ‘one tune’ is arguably even more memorable than ‘Miles Lane’: it has to this day the reputation of being one of the easiest and most comfortable tunes for a congregation to sing. A remarkable feature of the tune is that, except in one place, it proceeds ‘by step’ (that is, one note up or down), and it is this that makes it so singable. The eminent theologian Dr James Moffatt described it as ‘one of the best congregational tunes ever written’. Knapp called it ‘Wareham’ after the town where he was born. Thanks to him, the town’s name has been perpetuated in hymn-books all over the world for nearly three hundred years.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

2017-06-06 Play What They Want

Play What They Want by Man Forever.

With various vocal and instrumental collaborators providing long tones over Colpitts’ propulsive drum arrangements, the contrast between the two gives this album a trippy, psychedelic feel. I want more. <--Gratuitous Can Reference. #TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #KidMillions #JohnColpitts #ManForever #LaurieAnderson #YoLaTengo #MaryLattimore #GratuitousCanReference