Please turn to number 073 (First Tune) and join with the clarinets in “Ride On, Ride On in Majesty”.

Number: 73 (First Tune)
First Line: Ride On, Ride On in Majesty
Meter: L.M.
Tempo: Broadly, with dignity
Music: John Bacchus Dykes, 1823-76
Text: Henry Hart Milman, 1791-1868 a.

Clarinet arrangement: 073a.RideOnRideOn

A short hymn, only 8 measures long in this version, this is the first of three hymns for the celebration of “Palm Sunday”.

Applying the current “Hymprovisation” method. First time through as written, second time improvisation and variation over the accompaniment, third time back to the melody.

I was feeling a bit like featuring the Bass Clarinet as soloist, so I did.

John Bacchus Dykes

John Bacchus Dykes was born March 10, 1823, at Kingston upon Hull in England. He was a “natural” musician, and became the organist at his father’s church when only ten years old. At age 12, Dykes became assistant organist at St. John’s Church in Hull, where his grandfather was vicar.

The burden of caring for his large parish without help, together with the strain of the controversy with the bishop, took its toll on him and he died at only 53, on January 22, 1876 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England. He was buried at St. Oswald’s. After his death at St. Leonard’s-on-Sea, his great popularity was seen when his admirers raised 10,000 pounds to benefit his family.

In his music, as in his ecclesiastical work, he was less dogmatic than many of his contemporaries about the theological controversies of the day — he often responded to requests for tunes for non-Anglican hymns. In addition to his gift for writing music, he played the organ, piano, violin, and horn. He is thought to be the most representative and successful composer of Victorian hymn tunes. His tunes are standard repertory for all the major hymnals in the United States, after being first introduced 100 years ago in Baker’s “Hymns Ancient Modern.”

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal


Please turn to number 72 and join with the woodwinds in, “Savior, When in Dust”.

Three times through, Soprano Sax playing the melody part instead of clarinet. First time as written, some improvisation on the second time through, then a return to the written part on the third.

Number: 72
First Line: Savior, When in Dust
Meter: 7 7, 7 7. D.
Tempo: In moderate time
Music: Arranged by Benjamin Carr, 1768-1831
Text: Robert Grant

Clarinet Arrangement: 0072.SaviorWhenInDust

I guess this is a Spanish Chant which was arranged by Benjamin Carr.

Benjamin Carr (September 12, 1768 – May 24, 1831) was an American composer, singer, teacher, and music publisher.[1]
Born in London, he was the son of Joseph Carr and older brother of Thomas Carr. He was also the nephew of his namesake Benjamin Carr (1731–80), who ran an instrument-making and repair shop in London for over 20 years.[1]

He studied organ with Charles Wesley and composition with Samuel Arnold. In 1793 he traveled to Philadelphia with a stage company, and a year later went with the same company to New York, where he stayed until 1797. Later that year he moved to Philadelphia, where he became a prominent member of the city’s musical life. He was “decidedly the most important and prolific music publisher in America during the 1790s (as well as one of its most distinguished composers), conducting, in addition to his Philadelphia business, a New York branch from 1794 to 1797, when it was acquired by James Hewitt“.[2]

He was well known as a teacher of keyboard and singing, and he served as organist and choirmaster at St Augustine’s Catholic Church (1801–31) and at St Peter’s Episcopal Church (1816–31). In 1820 he was one of the principal founders of the Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia,[1][3] and he is known as the “Father of Philadelphia Music”.[4] Mrs. French, who had achieved a degree of fame as a singer, was one of his students.

The text is pretty grim, a catalog of Christ’s suffering and ultimate triumph. It is a bit odd, sort of an invocation.

1 Savior, when in dust to Thee
Low we bow the adoring knee;
When, repentant, to the skies
Scarce we lift our weeping eyes;
O, by all Thy pains and woe
Suffered once for man below,
Bending from Thy throne on high,
Hear our penitential cry!

2 By Thy helpless infant years,
By Thy life of want and tears,
By Thy days of deep distress
In the savage wilderness,
By the dread, mysterious hour
Of the insulting tempter’s pow’r,
Turn, O turn, a fav’ring eye;
Hear our penitential cry!

3 By thine hour of dire despair,
By thine agony of prayer,
By the cross, the nail, the thorn,
Piercing spear, and torturing scorn,
By the gloom that veiled the skies
O’er the dreadful sacrifice,
Listen to our humble sigh;
Hear our penitential cry!

4 By Thy deep expiring groan,
By the sad sepulchral stone,
By the vault whose dark abode
Held in vain the rising God,
O, from earth to heav’n restored,
Mighty, re-ascended Lord,
Bending from Thy throne on high,
Hear our penitential cry!

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal


Please turn to number 71 and join with the Woodwinds in “Print Thine Image”.

Number: 71
First Line: Print Thine Image
Meter: 8 7, 8 7, 7 7, 8 8.
Tempo: Brightly
Music: Geneval Psalter, 1551
Adapted and harm. by J. S. Bach, 1685-1750
Text: Thomas Hansen Kingo, 1634-1703
Tr. Jens Christian Aaberg, 1877-

Clarinet Arrangement: 0071.PrintThineImage

“Adapted and harmonized by J.S. Bach” always makes for a bit of a challenge. I upped the challenge to myself by doing a little “hymprovisation” and variation on the second and third times through.

This hymn is a single verse:

Print thine image pure and holy,
On my heart, O Lord of Grace;
So that nothing high nor lowly,
Thy blest likeness can efface.
Let the clear inscription be:
Jesus, crucified for me,
And the Lord of all creation,
Is my refuge and salvation.

“Print Thine image on my heart” is such an odd turn of phrase and Kingo is such an odd name, I had to look him up.

Thomas Hansen Kingo (15 December 1634 – 14 October 1703 Odense) was a Danish bishop, poet and hymn-writer born at Slangerup, near Copenhagen. His work marked the high point of Danish baroque poetry.

He belonged to a rather poor family partly of Scottish origin and was educated a clergyman. In his youth, Kingo wrote a series of poems picturing humorous scenes in village life and a pastoral love poem, Chrysillis. He studied theology at the University of Copenhagen, graduating in 1654, and for some time acted as private tutor. In 1661 he was appointed vicar to the pastor at Kirke Helsinge, and in 1668 he was ordained a minister at his native town, where his poetic activity began.

At first he essayed patriotic poems, but later devoted himself almost entirely to writing hymns, and in 1674 the first part of his Aandelige Siunge-Koor (“Spiritual Song Choir”) appeared; followed in 1681 by a second part. This work consists of a collection of beautiful hymns several of which are still popular in the Danish Church.

In 1677 Kingo was appointed bishop of Funen. Charged by the government with the compilation of a new hymn-book, he edited (1699) the so-called Kingo’s Psalmebog which contains eighty-five of his own compositions, and which is still used in various parts of Denmark and Norway. Some parts of the Danish rural population were firmly sticking to his hymns during the pietist and rationalist period contributing to their survival.

Though not the first Danish hymn writer Kingo must be considered the first real important one and also among the Danish poets of the 17th Century he is generally a leading figure. His hymns are born by a forceful and often Old Testamental wrath and renunciation of the world switching with Christian mildness and confidence. Both elements are thrown in relief by his private thrift and fighting nature. His worldly poems and patriotic songs are often long-winded and marked by outer effects but in short version he is unequalled, as in his both plain and worthy commemorative poem of the naval hero Niels Juel.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal


Please join with the clarinets on number 70, “O Lamb of God Most Holy”.

Number: 70
First Line: O Lamb of God Most Holy
Meter: 7 7, 7 7, 7 7 7.
Tempo: Slowly
Music: Nikolaus Decius, 1541
Text: Nikolaus Decius, 1541
Tr. Arthur Tozer Russell, 1806-74 a.

Clarinet Arrangement: 0070.OLambOfGodMostHoly

Hm, apparently, writing hymns for the church is more dangerous than I previously suspected. Girolamo Savonarola was hung and burned, while Nikolaus Decius is suspected to have been killed by poisoning just after he wrote this hymn.

Nikolaus Decius (also Degius, Deeg, Tech a Curia, and Nickel von Hof;[1] c. 1485 – 21 March 1541[2] (others say 1546[3]) was a German monk, hymn-writer and composer.

He was probably born in Hof in Upper Franconia, Bavaria, around 1485. He studied at the University of Leipzig and obtained a master’s degree at Wittenburg University in 1523 and became a monk.[4] Although a monk, he was an advocate of the Protestant Reformation and a disciple of Martin Luther.[4] He was Probst of the cloister at Steterburg from 1519 until July 1522 when he was appointed a master in the St. Katherine and Egidien School in Braunschweig.[2][5] He wrote in 1523 for Allein Gott in der Höh sei Ehr, adapted by Luther in 1525, a German paraphrase of the Latin Gloria.[6] Decius’s version was first sung on Easter Day at Braunschweig on 5 April 1523.[7] Decius’s Low German version first appeared in print in Gesang Buchby Joachim Sluter, printed in 1525.[7]

In 1526, Decius became preacher at the Church of St. Nicholas in Stettin at the same time as Paulus von Rhode was appointed preacher at St. James’s in Stettin.[2] In 1535 he became pastor of St. Nicholas and died there in March 1541 after a suspected poisoning.[2] Shortly before his death he wrote the hymn “O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig” (O Lamb of God, innocent) sung on a tune from the 13th century. Decius’s version was first published in Anton Cornivus‘s Christliche Kirchen-Ordnung in 1542.[4]Johann Sebastian Bach used it as a cantus firmus in the opening chorus of his St Matthew Passion. It was translated into English by Arthur Tozer Russell in the 19th century.[4]

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

Tacolicious, 09.26.2016


One of the best things about restaurants with Mexican food is, as a matter of course, they usually have more non-alcoholic options than many other restaurants. You’ve got your grain drinks like Horchata and Atole and you have your fruit drinks like Agua Fresca and Limonada. (All of which will get posts of their own!) Not to mention Mexican Coca-Cola and Jarritos.

The extremely successful Tacolicious chain of restaurants steps those normal Mexican restaurant options up a notch or two by adding a brace of creative non-alcoholic refreshers to their menu.

Started at the Ferry Building Farmer’s Market in 2009, they now have 3 very popular locations in San Francisco, one in Palo Alto, and one in San Jose, making them, perhaps, one of the most influential purveyors of non-alcoholic beverages in the Bay Area.

Tacolicious’ founder, Joe Hargrave was kind enough to respond to my questions about the humorously named subsection of their menu dedicated to non-alcoholic libations.

1) Recently, it seems more common for restaurants to leave their non-alcoholic options off the menu entirely, and have them as verbal options. What prompted you to feature non-alcoholic drinks on the Tacolicious menu?

“We know plenty of folks who choose not to consume alcohol for one reason or another and we feel strongly that a beverage program needs to be inclusive and not just give teetotalers the usual, pedestrian choice of iced tea or lemonade. Call them mocktails or just call them delicious drinks, but offering up mixed non-alcoholic beverages gives everyone—including kids—some more creative choices. “

2) As an, ahem, actual Recovering Bartender, in several senses of the phrase, I really like the humor in the subheading of the menu section you use for non alcoholic drinks, “Drivers, Kids, and Recovering Bartenders”. Who came up with that subheading and what sort of feedback do you get, positive or negative?

“I came up with it. It’s important not to take ourselves too seriously. Humor is a huge part of Tacolicious’s culture. “
3) Do you think having non-alcoholic drinks on the menu at Tacolicious increases their sales?
“Yes. Tons of people appreciate the fact that we’re looking out for them as much as the folks looking to imbibe a full-blown cocktail.”
4) What is a ball park figure for the percentage of non-alcoholic vs alcoholic drinks at your restaurants?
“We offer the Mia, Silas, and Moss on our regular menu (all named after our three kids), as well as housemade horchata and seasonal, housemade agua frescas. Of course the percentage of cocktails, beer and wine is higher than the NA, but we hope that we’re giving people enough options to satiate their desire for something non-alcoholic yet fun to drink. (And btw, you can always ask for our cocktails to be made without alcohol. The paloma is delicious without the tequila.)”


Please turn to number 69 and join with the clarinets in “Jesus, Refuge of the Weary.”

Number: 69
First Line: Jesus, Refuge of the Weary
Meter: 8 7, 8 7. D.
Tempo: With movement
Music: Johann Thommen’s Christenschatz, 1745
Text: Girolamo Savonarola, 1452-98
Tr. Jane Francesca Wilde, 1826-96

Clarinet Arrangement: 0069.JesusRefugeOfTheWeary

The author of this hymn’s text was quite an interesting fellow!

Girolmo Savonarola from the wikipedia.

Girolamo Savonarola (Italian: [savonaˈrɔːla]; 21 September 1452 – 23 May 1498) was an Italian Dominican friar and preacher active in Renaissance Florence. He was known for his prophecies of civic glory, the destruction of secular art and culture, and his calls for Christian renewal. He denounced clerical corruption, despotic rule and the exploitation of the poor. He prophesied the coming of a biblical flood and a new Cyrus from the north who would reform the Church. In September 1494, when Charles VIII of France invaded Italy and threatened Florence, such prophesies seemed on the verge of fulfillment. While Savonarola intervened with the French king, the Florentines expelled the ruling Medici and, at the friar’s urging, established a “popular” republic. Declaring that Florence would be the New Jerusalem, the world center of Christianity and “richer, more powerful, more glorious than ever”,[1] he instituted a campaign of extreme austerity, enlisting the active help of Florentine youth.

In 1495 when Florence refused to join Pope Alexander VI’s Holy League against the French, the Vatican summoned Savonarola to Rome. He disobeyed and further defied the pope by preaching under a ban, highlighting his campaign for reform with processions, bonfires of the vanities, and pious theatricals. In retaliation, the Pope excommunicated him in May 1497, and threatened to place Florence under an interdict. A trial by fire proposed by a rival Florentine preacher in April 1498 to test Savonarola’s divine mandate turned into a fiasco, and popular opinion turned against him. Savonarola and two of his supporting friars were imprisoned. Under torture, Savonarola confessed that he had invented his visions and prophecies. On May 23, 1498, Church and civil authorities condemned, hanged, and burned the three friars in the main square of Florence.

Savonarola’s devotees, the Piagnoni, kept his cause of republican freedom and religious reform alive well into the following century, although the Medici—restored to power in 1512 with the help of the papacy—eventually broke the movement.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal


Please turn to number 68 (Second Tune) and join with the clarinets in “Christian, Dost Thou See Them”.

Number: 68 (Second Tune)
First Line: Christian, Dost Thou See them
Meter: 6 5, 6 5. D.
Tempo: Thoughtfully
Music: John Bacchus Dykes, 1823-76
Text: Andrew of Crete, cir. 660-732
Tr. John Mason Neale, 1818-66

Clarinet Arrangement: 068b.ChristianDostThouSeeThem

I love a good minor dirge, and the first part of this tune is really pretty great. Unfortunately, half way through, the hymn switches keys, and from minor to major, at the same time as the text starts expressing sentiments of smiting, girding, battle, sorrow, and triumph.

Someone was very literal minded in their music arrangement.

So, I, uh, took some liberties with the arrangement.

The first section gets played twice at regular (slow) time, and the second in (appropriately) military double time. I also finish by returning the final chord to minor, as a sort of protest.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal


Please turn to number 68 (First Tune) and join with the clarinets in “Christian, Dost Thou See Them”.

Number: 68 (First Tune)
First Line: Christian, Dost Thou See Them
Meter: 6 5, 6 5. D.
Tempo: With energy
Music: Praxis Pietatis Melica, Frankfurt, 1668
Text: Andrew of Crete, cir. 660-732
Tr. John Mason Neale, 1818-66

Clarinet Arrangement: 068.ChristianDostThouSeeThem

I had an urge to take this one slowly, with a melancholy feel. The text is kind of depressing and reminds me of the things I like least about Christianity. Lots of smiting, girding, battles, and intolerence for other faiths.

1 Christian, dost thou see them
on the holy ground,
how the pow’rs of darkness
rage thy steps around?
Christian, up and smite them,
counting gain but loss,
in the strength that cometh
by the holy cross.

2 Christian, dost thou feel them,
how they work within,
striving, tempting, luring,
goading into sin?
Christian, never tremble;
never be downcast;
gird thee for the battle,
watch and pray and fast.

3 Christian, dost thou hear them,
how they speak thee fair?
“Always fast and vigil?
Always watch and prayer?”
Christian, answer boldly,
“While I breathe I pray!”
Peace shall follow battle,
night shall end in day.

4 Hear the words of Jesus:
“O my servant true:
thou art very weary –
I was weary too;
but that toil shall make thee
some day all mine own,
and the end of sorrow
shall be near my throne.”

Praxis Pietatis Melica” was a German Hymnal:

Praxis pietatis melica (Practice of Piety in Song)[1] is a Protestanthymnal first published in the 17th century by Johann Crüger. The hymnal, which appeared under this title from 1647 to 1737 in 45 editions, has been described as “the most successful and widely-known Lutheran hymnal of the 17th century”.[2] Crüger composed melodies to texts that were published in the hymnal and are still sung today, including “Jesu, meine Freude“, “Herzliebster Jesu” and “Nun danket alle Gott“. Between 1647 and 1661, Crüger first printed 90 songs by his friend Paul Gerhardt, including “O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden“.

Andrew of Crete was an early Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic Saint.

Saint Andrew of Crete (Greek: Ἀνδρέας Κρήτης, c. 650 – July 4, 712 or 726 or 740), also known as Andrew of Jerusalem, was an 8th-century bishop, theologian, homilist,[1] and hymnographer. He is venerated as a saint by Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic Christians.

Today, Saint Andrew is primarily known as a hymnographer. He is credited with the invention (or at least the introduction into Orthodox liturgical services) of the canon, a new form of hymnody. Previously, the portion of the Matins serrains inserted between the scripture verses. Saint Andrew expanded these refrains into fully developed poetic Odes, each of which begins with the theme (Irmos) of the scriptural canticle, but then goes on to expound the theme of the feast being celebrated that day (whether the Lord, the Theotokos, a saint, the departed, etc.).

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal


Please turn to Number 67 (Second Tune) and join with the clarinets in “Jesus, Name All Names Above”.

Number: 67 (Second Tune)
First Line: Jesus, Name All Names Above
Meter: 7 6, 7 6, 8 8, 7 7.
Music: Johann Schop, cir 1600-65
Harm. J. S. Bach 1685-1750
Text: Theoctistus of the Studium, cir. 890
Tr. John Mason Neale, 1818-66 a.

Clarinet Arrangement: 067b-jesusnameallnamesabove

Different music, same text. However, in this case, the music is “Harmonized” by none other than Johann Sebastian Bach.

Baroque music is all about theme and variation, so I tried a little “Hymnprovisation” myself with the melody and chord changes on the second and third time through.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal


Please turn to Number 67 (First Tune) and join with the clarinets in “Jesus, Name All Names Above”.

Number: 67 (First Tune)
First Line: Jesus, Name All Names Above
Meter: 7 6, 7 6, 8 8, 7 7.
Tempo: Quietly
Music: Ralph Alvin Strom, 1901-
Text: Theoctistus of the Studium, cir. 890
Tr. John Mason Neale, 1818-66 a.

Here is the pdf of the clarinet arrangement:067a-jesusnameallnamesabove

This setting is pretty modern sounding in its harmonies. Each part doubled, twice through. Audacity “Medium Room” Reverb Effect applied.

Naturally, “Theoktistus” I cannot resist researching a great name.

“Theoktistus was a monk at the great monastery of the Studium in Constantinople, circa 890. John Neale called him a friend of St. Joseph. Theoktistus’ only known work is Suppliant Canon to Jesus, found at the end of the Paracletice or Great Octoechus, a volume in eight parts, containing the Ferial Office for eight weeks.”

This is the full text of the Canto John Mason Neale translated:

Ἰησοῦ γλυκύτατε.

Jesu, Name all names above,
Jesu, best and dearest,
Jesu, Fount of perfect love,
Holiest, tenderest, nearest;
Jesu, source of grace completest,
Jesu purest, Jesu sweetest,
Jesu, Well of power Divine,
Make me, keep me, seal me Thine!

Jesu, open me the gate
That of old he enter’d,
Who, in that most lost estate,
Wholly on Thee ventur’d;
Thou, Whose Wounds are ever pleading,
And Thy Passion interceding,
From my misery let me rise
To a Home in Paradise!

Thou didst call the Prodigal:
Thou didst pardon Mary:
Thou Whose words can never fall,
Love can never vary:
Lord, to heal my lost condition,
Give—for Thou canst give—contrition;
Thou canst pardon all mine ill
If Thou wilt: O say, “I will!”

Woe, that I have turned aside
After fleshly pleasure!
Woe, that I have never tried
For the Heavenly Treasure!
Treasure, safe in Home supernal;
Incorruptible, eternal!
Treasure no less price hath won
Than the Passion of The Son!

Jesu, crown’d with Thorns for me,
Scourged for my transgression,
Witnessing, through agony,
That Thy good confession!
Jesu, clad in purple raiment,
For my evils making payment;
Let not all Thy woe and pain,
Let not Calvary, be in vain!

When I reach Death’s bitter sea
And its waves roll higher,
Help the more forsaking me
As the storm draws nigher:
Jesu, leave me not to languish,
Helpless, hopeless, full of anguish!
Tell me,—”Verily I say,
Thou shalt be with Me to-day!”

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal