121 – Come, Holy Ghost

Please turn your hymnals to number 121 and join with the clarinets in, “Come, Holy Ghost”.

Number: 121
First Line: Come, Holy Ghost
Name: MALVERN.
Meter: 6 6 4, 6 6 6 4.
Tempo: In moderate time
Music: The Hallelujah, 1849
Arr. by John Roberts, 1822-77
Text: Based on Veni, Sancte Spiritus
Tr. Ray Palmer, 1808-87

Clarinet Arrangement: 121-ComeHolyGhost

Veni Sancte Spiritus, sometimes called the “Golden Sequence,” is a sequence prescribed in the Roman Liturgy for the Masses of Pentecost and its octave, exclusive of the following Sunday.[1] It is usually attributed to either the thirteenth-century Pope Innocent III or to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Cardinal Stephen Langton, although it has been attributed to others as well.

Veni Sancte Spiritus is one of only four medieval Sequences which were preserved in the Missale Romanum published in 1570 following the Council of Trent (1545–63). Before Trent many feasts had their own sequences.[2] It is still sung today, having survived the liturgical changes following the Second Vatican Council.

It has been set to music by a number of composers, especially during the Renaissance, including Dufay, Josquin, Willaert, Palestrina, John Dunstaple, Lassus, Victoria, and Byrd. Later composers who have set the text include Arvo Pärt, Morten Lauridsen, Frank La Rocca and most familiarly to Catholics, Samuel Webbe.[3]

I returned to a bit of Hymnprovisation, feeling I wasn’t challenging myself enough lately, I hope you do not mind. This time I deployed the Bass Clarinet for the solo on the second verse.

While this arrangement isn’t ancient, the roots of the hymn are quite old. The author of the music appears to be another Welshman.

John Roberts used Ieuan Gwyllt as his bardic name. See also Ieuan Gwyllt, 1822-1877.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

2015-05-19 A Night Walking Through Mirrors

A Night Walking Through Mirrors by The Chicago/London Underground.

A sound landscape to get lost in. Wonderful.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #JohnEdwards #AlexanderHawkins #RobMazurek #ChadTaylor #CuneiformRecords

2015-05-18 Overseas V

Overseas V by Eivind Opsvik.

Sure, sure, Mr Opsvik, I appreciate your enthusiasm! But, I’m afraid I’m going to have to cite you anyway. Trafficking in Jazz idioms while strapped to a Rock rhythm section is unsafe at any speed.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #TonyMalaby #EivindOpsvik #JacobSacks #BrandonSeabrook #KennyWollesen

120-O Holy Spirit Enter In

Please turn your hymnals to number 120 and join with the clarinets in, “O Holy Spirit Enter In”.

Number: 120
First Line: O Holy Spirit Enter In
Name: WIE SCHöN LEUCHTET.
Meter: Irregular.
Tempo: With movement
Music: Phillipp Nicolai, 1556-1608
Adapted and harm. by J. S. Bach, 1685-1750
Text: Michael Schirmer, 1606-73
Tr. Catherine Winkworth

Clarinet Arrangement: 120-OHolySpiritEnterIn

This is the Fourth setting of this Phillipp Nicolai hymn, I’ve done so far. The first Arranged by J. S. Bach.

There are some difficult passages in this one, due to Bach loading the harmony parts with syncopation and even some 16th notes.

Fun.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

2015-05-17 No Filter

No Filter by the James Brandon Lewis Trio.

Music with its roots in the Jazz tradition is always moving forward, always incorporating new influences. Mr Lewis’ group brings a rap inflenced groove to the music formerly known as Jazz. While I enjoy individual tracks on this album, listening to the whole thing at once, it gets a little “samey”. Mr Lewis’ emulates the rhythmic cadences of a rapper with his Sax, but without lyrical variation, it ends up a bit like finding the backing tracks from a great lost rap album.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #WarrenGCrudupIII #NicholasRyanGrant #JamesBrandonLewis #AnthonyPirog #LukeStewart #NoFilter #JamesBrandonLewisTrio

2015-05-16 Journey in Satchidananda

Journey in Satchidananda by Alice Coltrane.

It was Pharoah Sanders Soprano Sax playing that initially grabbed my ears on and pulled me in to this recording, but listening closer, the real hero of the session is Cecil McBee on Bass. His solid playing is the root which allows the flowers of Alice’s harp and the brambles of Pharoah’s Soprano to flourish.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #RashiedAli #AliceColtrane #CharlieHaden #CecilMcBee #PharoahSanders #MajidShabazz #Tulsi #VishnuWood #JourneyinSatchidananda

119-Gracious Spirit, Holy Ghost

Please turn your hymnals to number 119 and join with the clarinets in, “Gracious Spirit, Holy Ghost”.

Number: 119
First Line: Gracious Spirit, Holy Ghost
Name: CAPETOWN.
Meter: 7 7, 7 5.
Tempo: Moderately slow
Music: Friedrich Filitz, 1804-76
Text: Christopher Wordsworth, 1807-85

Clarinet Arrangement: 119-GraciousSpiritHolyGhost

A very short hymn, only 8 lines, I waffled on how to treat it. Should I play it really slowly?
Many times, very quickly? I took a middle route, at 80bpm, and played it 4 times. Repetition is interesting.

FILITZ, Friedrich. b. Arnstadt, Thuringia, 16 Mar 1804; d. Bonn, 8 Dec 1876. Filitz graduated in philosophy and worked as a music critic and historian in Berlin (1843-47) before moving to Munich where he wrote Über einige Interessen der älteren Kirchenmusik (1853). The hymn tunes associated with Filitz were originally published in two books. Together with Ludwig Erk, he published Vierstimmige Choralsätze der vornehmsten Meister des 16. und 17. Jahrhunderts (Essen, 1845). He also compiled Vierstimmiges Choralbuch zu Kirchen- und Hausgebrauch (Berlin, 1847).”

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

2017-05-15 Original Pimpant

Original Pimpant by the Émile Parisien Quartet.

Romantic classically inspired Jazz, I guess you would call this. But, Romantic, as in Chopin, Scumann, Liszt, Tchaikovsky; not Romance, as in “Without Finance”. Though, I’m sure playing this music isn’t particularly remunerative, as they do a fair bit of “egg scrambling”.

Also, a great album cover!

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #PhillippeAbadie #SylvainDarrifourq #IvanGélugne #ÉmileParisien
#JulienTouéry

118-Spirit of Mercy

Please turn your hymnals to number 118 and join with the clarinets in, “Spirit of Mercy”.

Number: 118
First Line: Spirit of Mercy
Name: OMBERSLEY.
Meter: L.M.
Tempo: With devotion
Music: William Gladstone, 1840-91
Text: London Foundling Hospital Collection, 1774

Clarinet Arrangement: 118-Spirit_of_Mercy

Son of a Prime Minister, Member of Parliament, and Football player!

Talk about a fortunate son! Most of our usual suspect hymn composers, even most Anglicans, were not so well off!

William Henry Gladstone (3 June 1840 – 4 July 1891) was a BritishLiberal PartyMember of Parliament, and the eldest son of Prime MinisterWilliam Ewart Gladstone and his wife Catherine née Glynne.

Gladstone was born in Hawarden, Flintshire, Wales. He attended Eton College and read Greek and Latin at Christ Church, Oxford University. He was a Member of Parliament for a total of 20 years, representing Chester for 3, Whitby for 12 and East Worcestershire for 5. A singer and organist, he was well versed in musical history, especially the development of Anglican church music. He wrote on musical topics, and one of the views he expressed was that choral church services were to be deplored because “the choirs often discourage the congregations from singing.” He wrote the anthems “Gracious and Righteous” and “Withdraw Not Thou,” and chants, anthems, introits and organ voluntaries. He composed the hymn tunesHammersmith, to which Dear Lord and Father of Mankind is sometimes set, and Ombersley,[1] sometimes used for Lord of All Being, Throned Afar.

William played for Scotland in the first unofficial England v Scotland Football International in 1870. He was one of two sitting Members of Parliament to play for Scotland in this match, the other being John Wingfield Malcolm, MP for Boston.[2]

When his mother’s brother Sir Stephen Glynne died without heirs in 1874, the Glynne baronetcy became extinct, but William inherited the Glynne estates, including Hawarden Castle, which had in any case been the Gladstone’s family home since his grandfather Sir John Gladstone had used some of his substantial fortune to rescue the Glynne family from bankruptcy in the 1840s.[3] He was appointed High Sheriff of Flintshire for 1888.[4]

He died in London on 4 July 1891; his son William Glynne Charles Gladstone inherited Hawarden.[5]

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal