2017-04-21 Piano Song

Even though this is the “Matthew Shipp” Trio, the real star is drummer Newman Taylor-Baker. Especially on Magic Carpet, with its Stubblefield-esque high hat figure. His contributions are outstanding.

#MichaelBisio #NewmanTaylorBaker#MatthewShipp #MatthewShippTrio#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack#viewfromtheparkinglot


Please turn your hymnals to number 110 and join with the clarinets in “A Hymn of Glory Let Us Sing”.

Number: 110
First Line: A Hymn of Glory Let us Sing
Meter: L.M.
Tempo: Slowly, with movement
Music: Frederick M. A. Venua, 1788-1872
Text: The Venerable Bede, 673-735
Tr. St. 1-3, Elizabeth Rundle Charles, 1820-96
Tr. St. 4, Benjamin Webb, 1820-85

Clarinet Arrangement:110-AHymnOfGloryLetUsSing

I certainly remember hearing about The Venerable Bede when I was in the Lutheran Church, but I don’t remember details.

Bede (/ˈbd/ beed; Old English: Bǣda or Bēda; 672/3 – 26 May 735), also known as Saint Bede, Venerable Bede, and Bede the Venerable (Latin: Bēda Venerābilis), was an English monk at the monastery of St. Peter and its companion monastery of St. Paul in the Kingdom of Northumbria of the Angles (contemporarily Monkwearmouth–Jarrow Abbey in Tyne and Wear, England). He is well known as an author and scholar, and his most famous work, Ecclesiastical History of the English People gained him the title “The Father of English History“.

In 1899, Pope Leo XIII declared him a Doctor of the Church; he is the only native of Great Britain to achieve this designation; Anselm of Canterbury, also a Doctor of the Church, was originally from Italy. Bede was moreover a skilled linguist and translator, and his work made the Latin and Greek writings of the early Church Fathers much more accessible to his fellow Anglo-Saxons, which contributed significantly to English Christianity. Bede’s monastery had access to an impressive library which included works by Eusebius, Orosius, and many others.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal