068b.ChristianDostThouSeeThem

Please turn to number 68 (Second Tune) and join with the clarinets in “Christian, Dost Thou See Them”.

Number: 68 (Second Tune)
First Line: Christian, Dost Thou See them
Name: ST. ANDREW OF CRETE.
Meter: 6 5, 6 5. D.
Tempo: Thoughtfully
Music: John Bacchus Dykes, 1823-76
Text: Andrew of Crete, cir. 660-732
Tr. John Mason Neale, 1818-66

Clarinet Arrangement: 068b.ChristianDostThouSeeThem

I love a good minor dirge, and the first part of this tune is really pretty great. Unfortunately, half way through, the hymn switches keys, and from minor to major, at the same time as the text starts expressing sentiments of smiting, girding, battle, sorrow, and triumph.

Someone was very literal minded in their music arrangement.

So, I, uh, took some liberties with the arrangement.

The first section gets played twice at regular (slow) time, and the second in (appropriately) military double time. I also finish by returning the final chord to minor, as a sort of protest.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

068a.ChristianDostThouSeeThem

Please turn to number 68 (First Tune) and join with the clarinets in “Christian, Dost Thou See Them”.

Number: 68 (First Tune)
First Line: Christian, Dost Thou See Them
Name: GUTE BAUME BRINGEN.
Meter: 6 5, 6 5. D.
Tempo: With energy
Music: Praxis Pietatis Melica, Frankfurt, 1668
Text: Andrew of Crete, cir. 660-732
Tr. John Mason Neale, 1818-66

Clarinet Arrangement: 068.ChristianDostThouSeeThem

I had an urge to take this one slowly, with a melancholy feel. The text is kind of depressing and reminds me of the things I like least about Christianity. Lots of smiting, girding, battles, and intolerence for other faiths.

1 Christian, dost thou see them
on the holy ground,
how the pow’rs of darkness
rage thy steps around?
Christian, up and smite them,
counting gain but loss,
in the strength that cometh
by the holy cross.

2 Christian, dost thou feel them,
how they work within,
striving, tempting, luring,
goading into sin?
Christian, never tremble;
never be downcast;
gird thee for the battle,
watch and pray and fast.

3 Christian, dost thou hear them,
how they speak thee fair?
“Always fast and vigil?
Always watch and prayer?”
Christian, answer boldly,
“While I breathe I pray!”
Peace shall follow battle,
night shall end in day.

4 Hear the words of Jesus:
“O my servant true:
thou art very weary –
I was weary too;
but that toil shall make thee
some day all mine own,
and the end of sorrow
shall be near my throne.”

Praxis Pietatis Melica” was a German Hymnal:

Praxis pietatis melica (Practice of Piety in Song)[1] is a Protestanthymnal first published in the 17th century by Johann Crüger. The hymnal, which appeared under this title from 1647 to 1737 in 45 editions, has been described as “the most successful and widely-known Lutheran hymnal of the 17th century”.[2] Crüger composed melodies to texts that were published in the hymnal and are still sung today, including “Jesu, meine Freude“, “Herzliebster Jesu” and “Nun danket alle Gott“. Between 1647 and 1661, Crüger first printed 90 songs by his friend Paul Gerhardt, including “O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden“.

Andrew of Crete was an early Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic Saint.

Saint Andrew of Crete (Greek: Ἀνδρέας Κρήτης, c. 650 – July 4, 712 or 726 or 740), also known as Andrew of Jerusalem, was an 8th-century bishop, theologian, homilist,[1] and hymnographer. He is venerated as a saint by Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic Christians.

Today, Saint Andrew is primarily known as a hymnographer. He is credited with the invention (or at least the introduction into Orthodox liturgical services) of the canon, a new form of hymnody. Previously, the portion of the Matins serrains inserted between the scripture verses. Saint Andrew expanded these refrains into fully developed poetic Odes, each of which begins with the theme (Irmos) of the scriptural canticle, but then goes on to expound the theme of the feast being celebrated that day (whether the Lord, the Theotokos, a saint, the departed, etc.).

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

067b.JesusNameAllNamesAbove

Please turn to Number 67 (Second Tune) and join with the clarinets in “Jesus, Name All Names Above”.

Number: 67 (Second Tune)
First Line: Jesus, Name All Names Above
Name: WERDE MUNTER (ALTERED)
Meter: 7 6, 7 6, 8 8, 7 7.
Music: Johann Schop, cir 1600-65
Harm. J. S. Bach 1685-1750
Text: Theoctistus of the Studium, cir. 890
Tr. John Mason Neale, 1818-66 a.

Clarinet Arrangement: 067b-jesusnameallnamesabove

Different music, same text. However, in this case, the music is “Harmonized” by none other than Johann Sebastian Bach.

Baroque music is all about theme and variation, so I tried a little “Hymnprovisation” myself with the melody and chord changes on the second and third time through.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

067a.JesusNameAllNamesAbove

Please turn to Number 67 (First Tune) and join with the clarinets in “Jesus, Name All Names Above”.

Number: 67 (First Tune)
First Line: Jesus, Name All Names Above
Name: NAME OF JESUS.
Meter: 7 6, 7 6, 8 8, 7 7.
Tempo: Quietly
Music: Ralph Alvin Strom, 1901-
Text: Theoctistus of the Studium, cir. 890
Tr. John Mason Neale, 1818-66 a.

Here is the pdf of the clarinet arrangement:067a-jesusnameallnamesabove

This setting is pretty modern sounding in its harmonies. Each part doubled, twice through. Audacity “Medium Room” Reverb Effect applied.

Naturally, “Theoktistus” I cannot resist researching a great name.

“Theoktistus was a monk at the great monastery of the Studium in Constantinople, circa 890. John Neale called him a friend of St. Joseph. Theoktistus’ only known work is Suppliant Canon to Jesus, found at the end of the Paracletice or Great Octoechus, a volume in eight parts, containing the Ferial Office for eight weeks.”

This is the full text of the Canto John Mason Neale translated:

Ἰησοῦ γλυκύτατε.

Jesu, Name all names above,
Jesu, best and dearest,
Jesu, Fount of perfect love,
Holiest, tenderest, nearest;
Jesu, source of grace completest,
Jesu purest, Jesu sweetest,
Jesu, Well of power Divine,
Make me, keep me, seal me Thine!

Jesu, open me the gate
That of old he enter’d,
Who, in that most lost estate,
Wholly on Thee ventur’d;
Thou, Whose Wounds are ever pleading,
And Thy Passion interceding,
From my misery let me rise
To a Home in Paradise!

Thou didst call the Prodigal:
Thou didst pardon Mary:
Thou Whose words can never fall,
Love can never vary:
Lord, to heal my lost condition,
Give—for Thou canst give—contrition;
Thou canst pardon all mine ill
If Thou wilt: O say, “I will!”

Woe, that I have turned aside
After fleshly pleasure!
Woe, that I have never tried
For the Heavenly Treasure!
Treasure, safe in Home supernal;
Incorruptible, eternal!
Treasure no less price hath won
Than the Passion of The Son!

Jesu, crown’d with Thorns for me,
Scourged for my transgression,
Witnessing, through agony,
That Thy good confession!
Jesu, clad in purple raiment,
For my evils making payment;
Let not all Thy woe and pain,
Let not Calvary, be in vain!

When I reach Death’s bitter sea
And its waves roll higher,
Help the more forsaking me
As the storm draws nigher:
Jesu, leave me not to languish,
Helpless, hopeless, full of anguish!
Tell me,—”Verily I say,
Thou shalt be with Me to-day!”

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal