124a – Creator Spirit

Please turn your hymnals to number 124 (First Tune) and join with the clarinets in, “Creator Spirit”.

Number: 124 (First Tune)
First Line: Creator Spirit
Name: ATTWOOD.
Meter: 8 8, 8 8, 8 8.
Tempo: Broadly
Music: Thomas Attwood, 1765-1836
Text: John Dryden, 1631-1700
Based on Veni, Creator Spiritus

Clarinet Arrangement: 124a-CreatorSpirit

Frankly, this is one of those hymns where none of the individual parts seem to make melodic sense until they are heard as a whole. Everyone is jumping all over the place and the phrasing just seems odd. However, when you hear it all together it is kind of cool. At least, for a hymn.

Thomas Attwood (23 November 1765 – 24 March 1838) was an English composer and organist.

The son of a musician in the royal band, Attwood was born in London, probably in Pimlico. At the age of nine he became a chorister in the Chapel Royal, where he received training in music from James Nares and Edmund Ayrton.[1] In 1783 he was sent to study abroad at the expense of the Prince of Wales (afterwards George IV), who had been favourably impressed by his skill at the harpsichord. After two years in Naples, Attwood proceeded to Vienna, where he became a favourite pupil of Mozart. On his return to London in 1787 he held for a short time an appointment as one of the chamber musicians to the Prince of Wales.

In 1796 he was chosen as the organist of St Paul’s Cathedral, and in the same year he was made composer of the Chapel Royal. His court connection was further confirmed by his appointment as musical instructor to the Duchess of York, and afterwards to the Princess of Wales. For the coronation of George IV. he composed the anthem I was Glad. The king, who had neglected him for some years on account of his connection with the Princess of Wales, now restored him to favour, and in 1821 appointed him organist to his private chapel at Brighton. [2]

Soon after the institution of the Royal Academy of Music in 1823, Attwood was chosen to be one of the professors. He was also one of the original members of the Royal Philharmonic Society, founded in 1813. He wrote the anthem O Lord, Grant the King a Long Life, which was performed at the coronation of William IV, and he was composing a similar work for the coronation of Queen Victoria when he died at his house at 75 Cheyne Walk,[3] Chelsea, on 24 March 1838.[2]

Attwood’s funeral took place at St Paul’s Cathedral on 31 March 1838. He is buried in the Cathedral, in the crypt, under the organ.

Anyone who has studied English poetry will recognize the name “John Dryden”

Dryden, John. The name of this great English poet has recently assumed a new importance to the students of hymns, from a claim made on his behalf in regard to a considerable body of translations from the Latin published after his death (1701), in a Primer of 1706. The discussion of this point will preclude us from giving more than an outline of his life.

i. Biography.—John Dryden was the son of Erasmus, the third son of Sir Erasmus Dryden, and was born at Aid winkle, All Saints, Northants, Aug. 9, 1631. He was educated under Dr. Busby at Westminster, and entered Trip. College, Cambridge, in 1650. He took his B.A. in 1654, and resided nearly 7 years, though without a fellowship. He was of Puritan blood on both his father’s and mother’s side, and his training found expression in his first great poem, Heroic Stanzas on the death of Oliver Cromwell, 1658. In 1660, however, he turned, like the bulk of England, Royalist, and in his Astraea Redux, and in A Panegyric on the Coronation (1661), celebrated the Restoration. In 1663 he married Lady Elizabeth Howard. The marriage was apparently not a happy one; and there seems to be plain proof of Dryden’s unfaithfulness. In 1670 he was made Poet Laureate and Historiographer Royal, and he retained these posts until the accession of William (1688). He had joined the Roman Church in 1685, and remained steadfast to it at the fall of James II. This change is of special significance, as will appear below, in regard to his translations from the Latin. It greatly straitened his means, and compelled him to great literary exertion in his closing years. He died May 18, 1701, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

123- Come Down, O Love Divine

Please turn your hymnals to number 123 and join with the clarinets in, “Come Down, O Love Divine”.

Number: 123
First Line: Come Down, O Love Divine
Name: DOWN AMPNEY.
Meter: 6 6, 11. D.
Tempo: Moderately slow; may be sung in unison
Music: R. Vaughn Williams, 1872-1958
Text: Bianco da Siena, 1434
Tr. Richard Frederick Littledale, 1833-90

Clarinet Arrangement: 123-ComeDownOLoveDivine

Not the first R. Vaughn Williams hymn, but a nice one. I will note, the tune seems to be named after the town he was born in.

Ralph Vaughan Williams; OM 12 October 1872 – 26 August 1958) was an English composer of symphonies, chamber music, opera, choral music, and film scores. He was also a collector of English folk music and song: this activity both influenced his editorial approach to the English Hymnal, beginning in 1904, in which he included many folk song arrangements set as hymn tunes, and also influenced several of his own original compositions.

Ralph Vaughan Williams was born on 12 October 1872 in Down Ampney, Gloucestershire, where his father, the Reverend Arthur Vaughan Williams (the surname Vaughan Williams is an unhyphenated double-barrelled name of Welsh origin), was vicar. Following his father’s death in 1875 he was taken by his mother, Margaret Susan née Wedgwood (1843–1937), the great-granddaughter of the potter Josiah Wedgwood, to live with her family at Leith Hill Place, a Wedgwood family home in the Surrey Hills. He was also related to the Darwins, Charles Darwin being a great-uncle. Though born into the privileged intellectual upper middle class, Vaughan Williams never took it for granted and worked all his life for the democratic and egalitarian ideals in which he believed.

Despite his substantial involvement in church music, and the religious subject-matter of many of his works, he was described by his second wife as “an atheist … [who] later drifted into a cheerful agnosticism.” It is noteworthy that in his opera The Pilgrim’s Progress he changed the name of the hero from John Bunyan’s Christian to Pilgrim. He also set Bunyan’s hymn Who would true valour see to music using the traditional Sussex melody “Monk’s Gate”. For many church-goers, his most familiar composition may be the hymn tune Sine nomine written for the hymn “For All the Saints” by William Walsham How. The tune he composed for the mediaeval hymn “Come Down, O Love Divine” (Discendi, Amor santo by Bianco of Siena, ca.1434) is entitled “Down Ampney” in honour of his birthplace.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

122b – Come, Holy Spirit

Please turn your hymnals to number 122 (Second Tune) and join with the clarinets in “Come, Holy Spirit”.

Number: 122 (Second Tune)
First Line: Come, Holy Spirit, God and Lord
Name: PIXHAM.
Meter: L.M.
Tempo: Prayerfully
Music: Horatio W. Parker, 1863-1919
Text: Martin Luther, 1483-1546
Tr. Edward Traill Horn III, 1909-

Clarinet Arrangement: 122b-ComeHolySpirit

This is a really pleasant arrangement, one of the more “tuneful” hymns I’ve run across in a while. And, it’s no wonder, considering his bio!

Horatio William Parker (September 15, 1863 – December 18, 1919) was an American composer, organist and teacher. He was a central figure in musical life in New Haven, Connecticut in the late 19th century, and is best remembered as the undergraduate teacher of Charles Ives while the composer attended Yale University.

Before leaving New York City in 1893, Parker had completed his oratorio, Hora Novissima, set to the opening words of De contemptu mundi by Bernard of Cluny. It was widely performed in America; and also in England, in 1899 at Chester, and at the Three Choirs Festival at Worcester, the latter an honour never before paid an American composer.[6] European critics called it one of the finest of American compositions.[1] While he is mostly remembered for this single work, he was a prolific and versatile composer in a mostly conservative Germanic tradition, writing two operas, songs, organ and incidental music, and a copious quantity of works for chorus and orchestra. Influences in his compositions include Mendelssohn, Brahms, Wagner, as well as Debussy and Elgar in some works which he composed closer to 1900. During his lifetime he was considered to be the finest composer in the United States, a superior craftsman writing in the most advanced style.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

122a-Come, Holy Spirit

Please turn your hymnals to number 122 (First Tune) and join with the clarinets in, “Come, Holy Spirit”.

Number: 122 (First Tune)
First Line: Come, Holy Spirit, God and Lord
Name: KOMM HEILIGE GEIST, HERRE GOTT.
Meter: L.M.D. With Alleluias.
Tempo: With dignity, in unison
Music: Pre-Reformation Melody, Erfurt Gesangbuch, 1524
Text: Martin Luther, 1483-1546
Tr. Edward Traill Horn III, 1909-

Clarinet Arrangement: 122a-ComeHolySpirit

Whew. Again, you would think a relatively simple melody with relatively simple harmonization and rhythm would be easy. But it took me a number of tries to get all 4 parts executed well all eight times for this recording.

Contrary to the Quaker hymn, while it might be a gift, it isn’t easy being “simple”.

Luther, Martin, born at Eisleben, Nov. 10, 1483; entered the University of Erfurt, 1501 (B.A. 1502, M.A.. 1503); became an Augustinian monk, 1505; ordained priest, 1507; appointed Professor at the University of Wittenberg, 1508, and in 1512 D.D.; published his 95 Theses, 1517; and burnt the Papal Bull which had condemned them, 1520; attended the Diet of Worms, 1521; translated the Bible into German, 1521-34; and died at Eisleben, Feb. 18, 1546. The details of his life and of his work as a reformer are accessible to English readers in a great variety of forms. Luther had a huge influence on German hymnody.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

121 – Come, Holy Ghost

Please turn your hymnals to number 121 and join with the clarinets in, “Come, Holy Ghost”.

Number: 121
First Line: Come, Holy Ghost
Name: MALVERN.
Meter: 6 6 4, 6 6 6 4.
Tempo: In moderate time
Music: The Hallelujah, 1849
Arr. by John Roberts, 1822-77
Text: Based on Veni, Sancte Spiritus
Tr. Ray Palmer, 1808-87

Clarinet Arrangement: 121-ComeHolyGhost

Veni Sancte Spiritus, sometimes called the “Golden Sequence,” is a sequence prescribed in the Roman Liturgy for the Masses of Pentecost and its octave, exclusive of the following Sunday.[1] It is usually attributed to either the thirteenth-century Pope Innocent III or to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Cardinal Stephen Langton, although it has been attributed to others as well.

Veni Sancte Spiritus is one of only four medieval Sequences which were preserved in the Missale Romanum published in 1570 following the Council of Trent (1545–63). Before Trent many feasts had their own sequences.[2] It is still sung today, having survived the liturgical changes following the Second Vatican Council.

It has been set to music by a number of composers, especially during the Renaissance, including Dufay, Josquin, Willaert, Palestrina, John Dunstaple, Lassus, Victoria, and Byrd. Later composers who have set the text include Arvo Pärt, Morten Lauridsen, Frank La Rocca and most familiarly to Catholics, Samuel Webbe.[3]

I returned to a bit of Hymnprovisation, feeling I wasn’t challenging myself enough lately, I hope you do not mind. This time I deployed the Bass Clarinet for the solo on the second verse.

While this arrangement isn’t ancient, the roots of the hymn are quite old. The author of the music appears to be another Welshman.

John Roberts used Ieuan Gwyllt as his bardic name. See also Ieuan Gwyllt, 1822-1877.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

120-O Holy Spirit Enter In

Please turn your hymnals to number 120 and join with the clarinets in, “O Holy Spirit Enter In”.

Number: 120
First Line: O Holy Spirit Enter In
Name: WIE SCHöN LEUCHTET.
Meter: Irregular.
Tempo: With movement
Music: Phillipp Nicolai, 1556-1608
Adapted and harm. by J. S. Bach, 1685-1750
Text: Michael Schirmer, 1606-73
Tr. Catherine Winkworth

Clarinet Arrangement: 120-OHolySpiritEnterIn

This is the Fourth setting of this Phillipp Nicolai hymn, I’ve done so far. The first Arranged by J. S. Bach.

There are some difficult passages in this one, due to Bach loading the harmony parts with syncopation and even some 16th notes.

Fun.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

119-Gracious Spirit, Holy Ghost

Please turn your hymnals to number 119 and join with the clarinets in, “Gracious Spirit, Holy Ghost”.

Number: 119
First Line: Gracious Spirit, Holy Ghost
Name: CAPETOWN.
Meter: 7 7, 7 5.
Tempo: Moderately slow
Music: Friedrich Filitz, 1804-76
Text: Christopher Wordsworth, 1807-85

Clarinet Arrangement: 119-GraciousSpiritHolyGhost

A very short hymn, only 8 lines, I waffled on how to treat it. Should I play it really slowly?
Many times, very quickly? I took a middle route, at 80bpm, and played it 4 times. Repetition is interesting.

FILITZ, Friedrich. b. Arnstadt, Thuringia, 16 Mar 1804; d. Bonn, 8 Dec 1876. Filitz graduated in philosophy and worked as a music critic and historian in Berlin (1843-47) before moving to Munich where he wrote Über einige Interessen der älteren Kirchenmusik (1853). The hymn tunes associated with Filitz were originally published in two books. Together with Ludwig Erk, he published Vierstimmige Choralsätze der vornehmsten Meister des 16. und 17. Jahrhunderts (Essen, 1845). He also compiled Vierstimmiges Choralbuch zu Kirchen- und Hausgebrauch (Berlin, 1847).”

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

118-Spirit of Mercy

Please turn your hymnals to number 118 and join with the clarinets in, “Spirit of Mercy”.

Number: 118
First Line: Spirit of Mercy
Name: OMBERSLEY.
Meter: L.M.
Tempo: With devotion
Music: William Gladstone, 1840-91
Text: London Foundling Hospital Collection, 1774

Clarinet Arrangement: 118-Spirit_of_Mercy

Son of a Prime Minister, Member of Parliament, and Football player!

Talk about a fortunate son! Most of our usual suspect hymn composers, even most Anglicans, were not so well off!

William Henry Gladstone (3 June 1840 – 4 July 1891) was a BritishLiberal PartyMember of Parliament, and the eldest son of Prime MinisterWilliam Ewart Gladstone and his wife Catherine née Glynne.

Gladstone was born in Hawarden, Flintshire, Wales. He attended Eton College and read Greek and Latin at Christ Church, Oxford University. He was a Member of Parliament for a total of 20 years, representing Chester for 3, Whitby for 12 and East Worcestershire for 5. A singer and organist, he was well versed in musical history, especially the development of Anglican church music. He wrote on musical topics, and one of the views he expressed was that choral church services were to be deplored because “the choirs often discourage the congregations from singing.” He wrote the anthems “Gracious and Righteous” and “Withdraw Not Thou,” and chants, anthems, introits and organ voluntaries. He composed the hymn tunesHammersmith, to which Dear Lord and Father of Mankind is sometimes set, and Ombersley,[1] sometimes used for Lord of All Being, Throned Afar.

William played for Scotland in the first unofficial England v Scotland Football International in 1870. He was one of two sitting Members of Parliament to play for Scotland in this match, the other being John Wingfield Malcolm, MP for Boston.[2]

When his mother’s brother Sir Stephen Glynne died without heirs in 1874, the Glynne baronetcy became extinct, but William inherited the Glynne estates, including Hawarden Castle, which had in any case been the Gladstone’s family home since his grandfather Sir John Gladstone had used some of his substantial fortune to rescue the Glynne family from bankruptcy in the 1840s.[3] He was appointed High Sheriff of Flintshire for 1888.[4]

He died in London on 4 July 1891; his son William Glynne Charles Gladstone inherited Hawarden.[5]

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

117b-Come, Holy Ghost

Please turn your hymnals to number 117 (Second Tune) and join the clarinets in, “Come, Holy Ghost”.

Number: 117 (Second Tune)
First Line: Come, Holy Ghost
Name: THANKSGIVING.
Tempo: Slowly
Music: John Bacchus Dykes, 1823-76
Text: Based on Veni, Creator Spiritus
Tr. John Cosin, 1594-1672

Clarinet Arrangement: 117b-ComeHolyGhost

At age 12, Dykes be­came as­sist­ant or­gan­ist at St. John’s Church in Hull, where his grand­fa­ther was vicar. He stu­died at Wake­field and St. Cath­er­ine’s Hall in Cam­bridge, where he was a Dikes Scholar, Pre­si­dent of the Cam­bridge Uni­vers­i­ty Mu­sic­al So­ci­e­ty, and earned a BA in Clas­sics. In 1848, he be­came cur­ate at Malton, York­shire. For a short time, he was canon of Dur­ham Ca­thed­ral, then pre­cent­or (1849-1862). In 1862 he be­came Vi­car of St. Os­wald’s, Dur­ham (he named a son John St. Os­wald Dykes, and one of his tunes St. Oswald).

Dykes pub­lished ser­mons and ar­ti­cles on re­li­gion, but is best known for com­pos­ing over 300 hymn tunes. In his mu­sic, as in his ec­cles­i­as­tic­al work, he was less dog­ma­tic than ma­ny of his con­temp­o­rar­ies about the the­o­log­ic­al con­tro­ver­sies of the day—he oft­en ful­filled re­quests for tunes for non-Anglican hymns. In ad­di­tion to his gift for writ­ing mu­sic, he played the or­gan, pi­ano, vi­o­lin, and horn.

As written, this hymn has 4 sharps, which means, when transposed for b flat clarinet, that it ends up with 6 sharps. Ouch. Remembering that “E Sharp” is “F” and “A Sharp” is “B Flat”, taxes my feeble brain, but I tried my best to perform this piece accurately. Other than the mental games required for that, it is not that challenging a hymn, and mercifully short.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

117a-Come, Holy Ghost

Please turn your hymnals to number 117 (first version) and join with the clarinets in, “Come, Holy Ghost”.

Number: 117 (First Version)
First Line: Come, Holy Ghost
Name: VENI, CREATOR SPIRITUS.
Meter: L.M.
Tempo: Unison, broadly
Music: Plainsong Melody, Mode VIII
Arr. Winfred Douglas, 1867-1944
Text: Based on Veni, Creator Spiritus
Tr. John Cosin, 1594-1672

Clarinet Arrangement: 117a-ComeHolyGhost

“Veni, Creator Spiritus” is a venerable Latin Hymn whose origins date to the first century of the church.

Veni, Creator Spiritus (“Come Creator Spirit”) is a hymn believed to have been written by Rabanus Maurus in the 9th century. When the original Latin text is used, it is normally sung in Gregorian Chant. As an invocation of the Holy Spirit, in the practice of the Roman Catholic Church it is sung during the liturgical celebration of the feast of Pentecost (at both Terce and Vespers). It is also sung at occasions such as the entrance of Cardinals to the Sistine Chapel, when electing a new pope, as well as at the consecration of bishops, the ordination of priests, when celebrating the sacrament of Confirmation, the dedication of churches, the celebration of synods or councils, the coronation of kings, the profession of members of religious institutes and other similar solemn events.

Interestingly, it has been most copiously adapted and used by modern composers by everyone from Mahler to Stockhausen.

A motet for women’s voices to the text was among the last works of Hector Berlioz. Gustav Mahler set the Latin text to music in Part I of his Symphony No. 8 in E-flat major. Maurice Duruflé used the chant tune as the basis for his symphonic organ composition “Prélude, Adagio et Choral varié sur le thème du ‘Veni Creator'” in 1926/1930. Paul Hindemith concludes his Concerto for Organ and Orchestra with a Phantasy on “Veni, Creator Spiritus.” Krzysztof Penderecki wrote a motet for mixed choir, and the text has been set for chorus and orchestra by Cristóbal Halffter. Karlheinz Stockhausen used the text in the second hour of his Klang cycle in a piece for two singing harpists titled Freude (Joy).

For me, some of these early hymns are the hardest, not only because they are difficult to transcribe, but also because the harmonies are more asymetrical and complex than more modern hymns. There is a lot of unusual counting involved.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal