112-SeeTheConquerorMountsInTriumph

Please turn your hymnals to number 112 and join with the clarinets in “See The Conqueror Mounts in Triumph”.

Number: 112
First Line: See The Conqueror Mounts in Triumph
Name: REX GLORIAE.
Meter: 8 7, 8 7. D.
Tempo: Broadly, with dignity
Music: Henry Smart, 1813-79
Text: Christopher Wordsworth, 1807-85

Clarinet Arrangement: 112-SeeTheConquerorMountsInTriumph

Not a lot to say about this hymn. It is a bit challenging on clarinet, with many large jumps, especially in the bass and melody parts.

After taking a break for a bit after finishing the Easter hymns, getting back into the swing of things with these hymns celebrating “Ascension”.

Henry Thomas Smart (26 October 1813 – 6 July 1879) was an English organist and composer.

Though highly rated as a composer by his English contemporaries, Smart is now largely forgotten, save for his hymn tune Regent Square, which retains considerable popularity, and which is commonly performed with the words “Christ is Made the Sure Foundation”, “Light’s Abode, Celestial Salem”, or “Angels from the Realms of Glory“. His many compositions for the organ (some of which have been occasionally revived in recent years) were described as “effective and melodious, if not strikingly original” by the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, which also praised his part songs. A cantata by him, The Bride of Dunkerron was written for the Birmingham Festival of 1864; another cantata was a version of the play King René’s Daughter (1871). The oratorio Jacob was created for Glasgow in 1873; and his opera Bertha was produced with some success at the Haymarket in 1855.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

111-HailTheDayThatSeesHimRise

Please turn to number 111 and join with the clarinets in, “Hail The Day That Sees Him Rise”.

Number: 111
First Line: Hail The Day That Sees Him Rise
Name: ASCENSION
Meter: 7 7, 7 7. With Alleluias.
Tempo: Triumphantly
Music: William Henry Monk, 1823-89
Text: Charles Wesley, 1797-88 a.

Clarinet Arrangement: 111-HailTheDayThatSeesHimRise

Many of the Hymns we’ve covered, especially the older ones, come from a volume called “Hymns Ancient and Modern”, which was edited by the composer of this hymn’s music, William Henry Monk.

In 1852, he [William Henry Monk] became organist and choirmaster at St Matthias’ Church, Stoke Newington, where he made many changes: plainchant was used in singing psalms, and the music performed was more appropriate to the church calendar. By now, Monk was also arranging hymns, as well as writing his own hymn melodies. In 1857, his talents as composer, arranger, and editor were recognized when he was appointed the musical editor of Hymns Ancient and Modern, a volume first published in 1861, containing 273 hymns. After supplements were added (second edition—1875; later additions or supplements—1889, 1904, and 1916) it became one of the best-selling hymn books ever produced. It was for this publication that Monk supplied his famous “Eventide” tune which is mostly used for the hymn “Abide with Me“, as well as several others, including “Gethsemane”, “Ascension”, and “St. Denys”.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

2017-04-21 Piano Song

Even though this is the “Matthew Shipp” Trio, the real star is drummer Newman Taylor-Baker. Especially on Magic Carpet, with its Stubblefield-esque high hat figure. His contributions are outstanding.

#MichaelBisio #NewmanTaylorBaker#MatthewShipp #MatthewShippTrio#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack#viewfromtheparkinglot

110-AHymnOfGloryLetUsSing

Please turn your hymnals to number 110 and join with the clarinets in “A Hymn of Glory Let Us Sing”.

Number: 110
First Line: A Hymn of Glory Let us Sing
Name: PARK STREET.
Meter: L.M.
Tempo: Slowly, with movement
Music: Frederick M. A. Venua, 1788-1872
Text: The Venerable Bede, 673-735
Tr. St. 1-3, Elizabeth Rundle Charles, 1820-96
Tr. St. 4, Benjamin Webb, 1820-85

Clarinet Arrangement:110-AHymnOfGloryLetUsSing

I certainly remember hearing about The Venerable Bede when I was in the Lutheran Church, but I don’t remember details.

Bede (/ˈbd/ beed; Old English: Bǣda or Bēda; 672/3 – 26 May 735), also known as Saint Bede, Venerable Bede, and Bede the Venerable (Latin: Bēda Venerābilis), was an English monk at the monastery of St. Peter and its companion monastery of St. Paul in the Kingdom of Northumbria of the Angles (contemporarily Monkwearmouth–Jarrow Abbey in Tyne and Wear, England). He is well known as an author and scholar, and his most famous work, Ecclesiastical History of the English People gained him the title “The Father of English History“.

In 1899, Pope Leo XIII declared him a Doctor of the Church; he is the only native of Great Britain to achieve this designation; Anselm of Canterbury, also a Doctor of the Church, was originally from Italy. Bede was moreover a skilled linguist and translator, and his work made the Latin and Greek writings of the early Church Fathers much more accessible to his fellow Anglo-Saxons, which contributed significantly to English Christianity. Bede’s monastery had access to an impressive library which included works by Eusebius, Orosius, and many others.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal