2017-06-17 Collider

Collider by The DKV Thing (double) Trio.

The DKV trio, (Hamid Drake, Kent Kessler, Ken Vandermark) vs. The Thing, (Ingebrig Håker Flaten, Mats Gustafsson, Paal Nilssen-Love). It’s hard to pick what part of this album I like the best. The intricate, and often funky, polyrhythms generated between Drake and Nilssen-Love? The awesome low end and Arco work of Håker Flaten and Kessler? The virile, competitive, skronk-fest between Vandermark and Gustafsson? I hate to use a hackneyed phrase like, “It’s All Good,” but, it is ALL great. If this album doesn’t wake you up, you’re probably dead. (Also, it’s awesome that the Google dictionary has added “skronk-fest” to its auto-complete.)

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #HamidDrake #IngebrigHåkerFlaten #MatsGustafsson #KentKessler #PaalNilssenLove #KenVandermark #TheThing #DKVTrio

2017-06-15 The Nearer The Bone, The Sweeter The Meat

The Nearer The Bone, The Sweeter The Meat by Brötzmann/Miller/Moholo.

There is no shortage of great album titles among the Brötzmann records for FMP. Brain of a Dog in Section, Nipples, Machine Gun, Half a Dog Can’t Piss, etc. The Nearer The Bone, The Sweeter The Meat is particularly great, and a particularly great album. Recorded in 1979, a meeting between Brötzmann and two expat South African players, Louis Moholo and Harry Miller, proved especially fruitful. The sensitivity of Moholo and Miller allows Brötzmann to occasionally take his foot off the gas and play melodically, building drama and tension.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #freimusicproduktion #FMP #DestinationOUT #PeterBrötzmann#LouisMoholo #HarryMiller

131 – Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty

Please turn your hymnals to number 131 and join with the saxophones in, “Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty”.

Number: 131
First Line: Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty
Name: NICAEA.
Meter: Irregular.
Tempo: Joyfully, with dignity
Music: John Bacchus Dykes, 1823-76
Text: Reginald Heber, 1783-1826

Clarinet Arrangement: 131-HolyHolyHolyLordGodAlmighty

This is another VERY well known and familiar hymn and I quite enjoyed playing it. However, it is slightly annoying that it has 4 sharps for concert, which means it has 6 sharps when transposed for bflat instruments, which is A LOT of sharps. As I’ve mentioned before, it messes b sharp and e sharp sort of mess with my head, since they are C and F, respectively.

This is the first of the hymns in celebration of “Trinity Sunday”.

Holy, Holy, Holy!” is a Christianhymn written by Reginald Heber (1783–1826).[1][2][3] Its lyrics speak specifically of the Holy Trinity,[2][3] having been written for use on Trinity Sunday.[3] It quotes the Sanctus of the Latin Mass, which translated into English begins “Holy, Holy, Holy! Lord God of Hosts”. The text also paraphrases Revelation 4:1–11John Bacchus Dykes composed the tune Nicaea for this hymn in 1861.[1][2][3] The tune name is a tribute to the First Council of Nicaeawhich formalized the doctrine of the Trinity in 325.[2][3]

This sort of thing:

Holy, holy, holy, Lord God Almighty!
Early in the morning our song shall rise to thee;
Holy, holy, holy, merciful and mighty,
God in three persons, blessed Trinity

Holy, holy, holy! all the saints adore thee,
Casting down their golden crowns around the glassy sea,
Cherubin and seraphim falling down before thee,
Which wert, and art, and evermore shalt be.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

130 – Holy Spirit, Truth Divine

Please turn your hymnals to number 130 and join with the saxophones in, “Holy Spirit, Truth Divine”.

Number: 130
First Line: Holy Spirit, Truth Divine
Name: SONG 13.
Meter: 7 7, 7 7.
Tempo: Quietly
Music: Orlando Gibbons, 1583-1625
Text: Samuel Longfellow, 1819-92

Clarinet Arrangement: 130b-HolySpiritTruthDivine

Since this is the last hymn for Pentecost, I thought it might be a good idea to explain it a bit.

Pentecost Sunday (June 4) marks the day most Christians believe the Holy Spirit descended on the followers of Jesus after his death, resurrection and ascension. The story comes from the New Testament Book of Acts: “Suddenly a sound like the blowing of a violent wind came from heaven and filled the whole house where they were sitting. They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them.  All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them.” Jesus’ followers were amazed — they could speak languages they never knew before and they could understand others they had never heard. The Apostle Peter stood up and preached his first sermon — so many Christians think of this holiday as the “birthday” of the church.

I’ve always thought Pentecost was a little “psychedelic”, what with the speaking in tongues and flames over people’s heads.

So, I had an idea to try to make this arrangement a little psychedelic. I don’t think I quite got to psychedelic, it’s a bit more ritualistic or new wave-ish. Sort of a more relaxed version of something Killing Joke would do. Anyway.

I wrote a drum part in the arranging program I use, MuseScore, exported it to a midi file, then imported the midi track into Garageband. Then I did the same with an electric bass part. The nifty thing about midi instruments is a) you don’t have to buy them b) you don’t have to play them c) you don’t have to respect the physical limitations of the instrument or the player. So, yeah, that bass guitar part is about an octave below what a “normal” electric bass guitar can play.

The text for this hymn was written by Samuel Longfellow, who was a Unitarian pastor and hymn writer, and they are quite nice and not particularly specifically religious.

Holy Spirit, truth divine,
Dawn upon this soul of mine;
Word of God, and inward light,
Wake my spirit, clear my sight.

Holy Spirit, love divine,
Glow within this heart of mine;
Kindle every high desire,
Perish self in thy pure fire.

Holy Spirit, power divine,
Fill and nerve this will of mine;
By thee may I strongly live,
Bravely bear, and nobly strive.

Holy Spirit, peace divine,
Still this restless heart of mine;
Speak to calm this tossing sea,
Stayed in thy tranquility.

Holy Spirit, right divine,
King within my conscious reign;
Be my law, and I shall be,
Firmly bound, for ever free. Amen.

A bit more about Samuel Longfellow:

Samuel Longfellow was born June 18, 1819, in Portland, Maine, the last of eight children of Stephen and Zilpah (Wadsworth) Longfellow.[1] His older brother was the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. He attended Harvard Collegeand graduated in 1839 ranked eighth in a class of 61.[2] He went on to study at Harvard Divinity School, where his classmates included Thomas Wentworth Higginson and Samuel Johnson, with whom he would later collaborate in his hymn writing.

He is considered part of the second-generation of transcendentalists;[3] after becoming a Unitarian pastor, he adapted the transcendental philosophy he had encountered in divinity school into his hymns and sermons.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

2017-06-14 Lá Vem a Morte

Lá Vem a Morte by Boogarins.

Brazilian samba run through a psychedelic dub blender. Very cool. Ends up reminding me a bit of My Bloody Valentine. Sad I missed their show at The Chapel last week. Another release courtesy of the exotic music explorations of the wonderful Michele K-Tel.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #Boogarins #LáVemAMorte

2017-06-13 Another Helpful Medicine

Another Helpful Medicine by Aurochs.

Toronto based Aurochs are a keyboard, bass, drums, and “electronics” quartet. The songs on this album are arranged as a continuous track. Minimal, atmospheric Jazz which occasionally breaks into a groove. I like how they take the time to develop moods and themes.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #Aurochs #AurochsMusic #AliBerkok #PeteJohnson #JakeOelrichs #MikeSmith

2017-06-12 Adelante

Adelante by Han Bennink Trio.

A mix of original tunes, a standard, a handful of Mengelberg pieces, and some improvisations, Adelante has a familiar feel, even on it’s most “out” sections. Toldham and Badenhorst are both very tuneful players. Overall, a pleasing album, if occasionally a bit bland.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #HanBennink #JoachimBadenhorst #SimonToldham

129 – Spirit of God

Please turn your hymnals to number 129 and join with the Saxophones in, “Spirit of God”.

Number: 129
First Line: Spirit of God
Name: MORECAMBE.
Meter: 10 10, 10 10.
Tempo: With reverence
Music: Ascribed to Frederick Cook Atkinson, 1841-97
Text: George Croly, 1780-1860

Saxophone Arrangement: 129-SpiritOfGod

This is a very familiar sounding hymn! Maybe the most familiar sounding of any of the Pentecost hymns.

MORECAMBE was composed in 1870 by Frederick C. Atkinson (b. Norwich, England, 1841; d. East Dereham, England, 1896) as a setting for Henry Lyte’s “Abide with Me” (442). It was first published in G. S. Barrett and E.J. Hopkins’s Congregational Church Hymnal (1887). The tune is named for a coastal town on Morecambe Bay near Lancaster, England, a town not far from Bradford, where Atkinson served as organist.

As a boy Atkinson was a chorister and assistant organist at Norwich Cathedral. In 1867 he graduated with a Bachelor of Music degree from Cambridge and then served as organist and choirmaster in St. Luke’s Church, Manningham, Bradford. He also held that position at Norwich Cathedral and at St. Mary’s Parish Church in Lewisham. Atkinson wrote hymn tunes, anthems, and complete Anglican services, as well as songs and piano pieces.

MORECAMBE has a good melodic contour and a strong rise to its climax but then concludes rather weakly. (See comments on the generic group of tunes that includes MORECAMBE at PHH 276.) Try singing this fervent prayer to MORESTEAD (295), a tune with a very different character that will shed new light on the text.

Psalter Hymnal Handbook, 1988

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

128 – Lord, Let Thy Spirit

Please turn your hymnals to number 128 and join with the saxophones in,”Lord, Let Thy Spirit”.

Number: 128
First Line: Lord, Let Thy Spirit
Name: BERGGREN (ALT.).
Meter: 12 10, 11 10.
Tempo: Serenely
Music: Andreas Peter Berggren, 1801-80
Text: Valdimar Briem, 1848-1930

Clarinet Arrangement: 128-LordLetThySpirit

After mixing 8 saxes for the last hymn, I decided 4 saxophones was plenty!

Anyway, this is quite a pleasant, if somewhat plain, hymn.

Andreas Peter Berggren (March 2, 1801 – November 8, 1880) was a Danish composer, organist, and pedagogue.

Berggreen was born and died in Copenhagen. He initially studied law before pursuing a career in music, studying under Christopher Ernst Friedrich Weyse. In addition to Weyse, Berggreen was also heavily influenced by the German musician Johann Abraham Peter Schulz.

Berggreen was the organist at Trinitatis Church in Copenhagen from 1838 and taught singing at Metropolitanskolen from 1843. In 1859 he was appointed a song inspector by the Danish government.

Apart from several pieces of incidental music, a cantata, solo piano works, and songs, he published the folk song collections Melodier til Salmebog (1853) and Folk Sange og Melodier (1842–71). The latter comprises eleven large volumes, and includes folk songs in Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, German, English, French and Italian (Russian folk songs are also represented but in German translation).

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

2017-06-09 The Damage is Done

The Damage is Done by McPhee/Brötzmann/Kessler/Zerang.

An early tendency towards noir jazz, encouraged by Mr Kessler’s bass lines, leads towards some pleasantly lyrical passages from Brötzmann. However, when McPhee switches to Tenor, about 20 minutes in, the take-no-prisoners, two Tenor skronk-fest you were hoping for materializes. Invigorating.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #JoeMcPhee #PeterBrötzmann #KentKessler #MichaelZerang