2017-05-25 Art of the Improv Trio Volume 4

The Art of The Improv Trio Volume 4. Gerald Cleaver, William Parker, and Ivo Perelman.

Mr Perelman must have had three espressos before this set, because he is out in front, right out of the gate. After a few failed attempts to connect with Perelman, Cleaver and Parker establish a dialogue between themselves and carry on. Perelman eventually realizes he’s not in sync with the rest of the trio, and tries to connect with what Parker and Cleaver are doing, but never finds a way in. I found myself wishing I could turn off Perelman’s Sax and just listen to the Bass and Drums as a duo.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #GeraldCleaver #WilliamParker #IvoPerelman

2017-05-24 Art of the Improv Trio Volume 3

The Art of The Improv Trio Volume 3. Gerald Cleaver, Ivo Perelman, and Matthew Shipp.

The “Jazziest” and, (for me,) most immediately enjoyable of these recordings, so far. The interplay between Cleaver and Perelman is a delight to listen to.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #GeraldCleaver #IvoPerelman #MatthewShipp

2017-05-23 Art of the Improv Trio Volume 2

. Whit Dickey, Mat Maneri, and Ivo Perelman.

Interesting how Mr Perelman tailors his Tenor playing to his partners. In this case he is matching Maneri’s cello with a formidable display of his glissando technique and upper register playing. Very different from Volume One.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack
#WhitDickey #MatManeri #IvoPerelman

121 – Come, Holy Ghost

Please turn your hymnals to number 121 and join with the clarinets in, “Come, Holy Ghost”.

Number: 121
First Line: Come, Holy Ghost
Name: MALVERN.
Meter: 6 6 4, 6 6 6 4.
Tempo: In moderate time
Music: The Hallelujah, 1849
Arr. by John Roberts, 1822-77
Text: Based on Veni, Sancte Spiritus
Tr. Ray Palmer, 1808-87

Clarinet Arrangement: 121-ComeHolyGhost

Veni Sancte Spiritus, sometimes called the “Golden Sequence,” is a sequence prescribed in the Roman Liturgy for the Masses of Pentecost and its octave, exclusive of the following Sunday.[1] It is usually attributed to either the thirteenth-century Pope Innocent III or to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Cardinal Stephen Langton, although it has been attributed to others as well.

Veni Sancte Spiritus is one of only four medieval Sequences which were preserved in the Missale Romanum published in 1570 following the Council of Trent (1545–63). Before Trent many feasts had their own sequences.[2] It is still sung today, having survived the liturgical changes following the Second Vatican Council.

It has been set to music by a number of composers, especially during the Renaissance, including Dufay, Josquin, Willaert, Palestrina, John Dunstaple, Lassus, Victoria, and Byrd. Later composers who have set the text include Arvo Pärt, Morten Lauridsen, Frank La Rocca and most familiarly to Catholics, Samuel Webbe.[3]

I returned to a bit of Hymnprovisation, feeling I wasn’t challenging myself enough lately, I hope you do not mind. This time I deployed the Bass Clarinet for the solo on the second verse.

While this arrangement isn’t ancient, the roots of the hymn are quite old. The author of the music appears to be another Welshman.

John Roberts used Ieuan Gwyllt as his bardic name. See also Ieuan Gwyllt, 1822-1877.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

2015-05-19 A Night Walking Through Mirrors

A Night Walking Through Mirrors by The Chicago/London Underground.

A sound landscape to get lost in. Wonderful.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #JohnEdwards #AlexanderHawkins #RobMazurek #ChadTaylor #CuneiformRecords

2015-05-18 Overseas V

Overseas V by Eivind Opsvik.

Sure, sure, Mr Opsvik, I appreciate your enthusiasm! But, I’m afraid I’m going to have to cite you anyway. Trafficking in Jazz idioms while strapped to a Rock rhythm section is unsafe at any speed.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #TonyMalaby #EivindOpsvik #JacobSacks #BrandonSeabrook #KennyWollesen

120-O Holy Spirit Enter In

Please turn your hymnals to number 120 and join with the clarinets in, “O Holy Spirit Enter In”.

Number: 120
First Line: O Holy Spirit Enter In
Name: WIE SCHöN LEUCHTET.
Meter: Irregular.
Tempo: With movement
Music: Phillipp Nicolai, 1556-1608
Adapted and harm. by J. S. Bach, 1685-1750
Text: Michael Schirmer, 1606-73
Tr. Catherine Winkworth

Clarinet Arrangement: 120-OHolySpiritEnterIn

This is the Fourth setting of this Phillipp Nicolai hymn, I’ve done so far. The first Arranged by J. S. Bach.

There are some difficult passages in this one, due to Bach loading the harmony parts with syncopation and even some 16th notes.

Fun.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

2015-05-17 No Filter

No Filter by the James Brandon Lewis Trio.

Music with its roots in the Jazz tradition is always moving forward, always incorporating new influences. Mr Lewis’ group brings a rap inflenced groove to the music formerly known as Jazz. While I enjoy individual tracks on this album, listening to the whole thing at once, it gets a little “samey”. Mr Lewis’ emulates the rhythmic cadences of a rapper with his Sax, but without lyrical variation, it ends up a bit like finding the backing tracks from a great lost rap album.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #WarrenGCrudupIII #NicholasRyanGrant #JamesBrandonLewis #AnthonyPirog #LukeStewart #NoFilter #JamesBrandonLewisTrio

2015-05-16 Journey in Satchidananda

Journey in Satchidananda by Alice Coltrane.

It was Pharoah Sanders Soprano Sax playing that initially grabbed my ears on and pulled me in to this recording, but listening closer, the real hero of the session is Cecil McBee on Bass. His solid playing is the root which allows the flowers of Alice’s harp and the brambles of Pharoah’s Soprano to flourish.

#TodaysCommuteSoundtrack #RashiedAli #AliceColtrane #CharlieHaden #CecilMcBee #PharoahSanders #MajidShabazz #Tulsi #VishnuWood #JourneyinSatchidananda