031.AngelsFromtheRealmsofGlory

Open your hymnals to number 31 and join with the clarinets in “Angels, From the Realms of Glory”.

Name: REGENT SQUARE
Meter: 8 7, 8 7, 8 7.
Tempo: Moderately slow, with dignity
Music: Henry Smart, 1813-79
Text: James Montgomery, 1771-1854

This hymn does seem super familiar, even though, for me, it isn’t one of the REALLY well known Christmas Hymns.

From the wikipedia article:

“Angels from the Realms of Glory” is a Christmas carol written by Scottish poet James Montgomery.[1] It was first printed in the Sheffield Iris on Christmas Eve 1816, though it only began to be sung in churches after its 1825 reprinting in the Montgomery collection The Christian Psalmist and in the Religious Tract Society’s The Christmas Box or New Year’s Gift.[1]

Before 1928, the hymn was sung to a variety of tunes, including “Regent Square”, “Lewes” by John Randall, and “Wildersmouth” or “Feniton Court” by Edward Hopkins.[1] In the United States, the hymn is today most commonly sung to the tune of “Regent Square” by Henry Smart.[1] In the United Kingdom, however, the hymn came to be sung to the French carol tune “Iris”[2] (Les anges dans nos campagnes, the tune used for “Angels We Have Heard on High”) after this setting was published in the Oxford Book of Carols.[1] Sometimes the “Gloria in excelsis Deo” refrain is sung in place of Montgomery’s original lyric: “Come and worship Christ the new-born King”. On A Christmas Cornucopia, Annie Lennox sings this song but substitutes “Gloria in excelsis Deo” for the “Come and worship Christ the new-born King” refrain. Paul Poulton recorded a rock version of this song on his Grooves 4 Scrooge album.

Annie Lenox, who knew?

PDF of the clarinet arrangement: 031.ServiceBookAndHymnal

Doubled all the parts and applied the usual tweaked Audacity “church hall” Reverb effect.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

030.AngelsWeHaveHeardonHigh

Please turn to number 30 and join with the clarinets in, “Angels We Have Heard on High”.

Name: GLORIA (IRIS).
Meter: 7 7, 7 7. With Refrain.
Tempo: Brightly
Music: French Carol
Arr. by Edward Shippen Barnes, 1887-
Text: Traditional French Carol
Alt., Earl Marlatt, 1892-

Whew, another of the warhorses, “Angels We Have Heard on High”.

From the wikipedia article:

The words of the song are based on a traditional French carol known as Les Anges dans nos campagnes (literally, “Angels in our countryside”) composed by an unknown author in Languedoc, France. That song has received many adjustments or alignments including its most common English version that was translated in 1862 by James Chadwick, the Roman Catholic Bishop of Hexham and Newcastle, northeast England. The carol quickly became popular in the West Country, where it was described as ‘Cornish’ by R.R. Chope, and featured in Pickard-Cambridge‘s Collection of Dorset Carols.[1]

Took me a while to work up the courage to even try this one. And then another little while to get over the way that I had sung it as a child.

PDF of the Clarinet Arrangement: 030.ServiceBookAndHymnal

I think it turned out pretty well, mostly trying to modulate the clarinet and attempt to be more musical on some of the passages which would be hit pretty hard while caroling.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

029.BreakForthOBeauteousHeavenlyLight

Please turn to number 29 and join with the clarinets in “Break Forth, O Beauteous Heavenly Light”.

Name: Schop.
Meter: 8 7, 8 7, 8 8, 7 7.
Tempo: Joyously
Music: Johann Schop, cir 1600-65
Harm. J. S. Bach, 1685-1750
Text: Johann Rist, 1607-67
Tr. St. 1, composite
Tr. St. 2, Arthur Tozer Russell, 1806-74

Whew, another barn burner from that joker, J. S. Bach.

029.ServiceBookAndHymnal

Like the last Bach arrangement, I stuck with the Soprano clarinets for this one, though I did multitrack the “Soprano” part several times.

But then I went back and added in the bass clarinet:

Which do you prefer?

These Baroque pieces are pretty challenging, at least compared to most of the hymns. Lots of counterpoint going on in the Tenor and Bass parts, often making those parts harder to play than the melody part.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

028.TheHappyChristmas

Please turn to number 28 and join with the clarinets in, “The Happy Christmas”.

Name: EMANNUEL
Meter: L.M.
Tempo: Joyfully
Music: Carl C.N. Balle, 1806-55
Text: Nikolai F.S. Grudtvig, 1783-1872
Tr. Charles Porterfield Krauth, 1823-83

Not much to say about this one, it’s not one I remember. It’s kind of pretty and a bit folky, but no Sea Chanty. Transposed for clarinet, it did end up having 6 sharps, which is kind of annoying. Tough to remember e sharp is actually just f natural.

Here’s the clarinet arrangement: 028.ServiceBookAndHymnal

4 Soprano Clarinets on the “soprano” part, 1 Soprano Clarinet playing “alto”, 1 Soprano Clarinet playing “tenor”, and 1 bass playing, duh, “bass”. Slightly tweaked audacity “Church Hall” Reverb Effect.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

017b.ServiceBookAndHymnal

Please turn your hymnals to number 17 (Second Tune) and join with the clarinets in “Of the Father’s Love Begotten”.

Name: DIVINUM MYSTERIUM. (Corde Natus Ex Parentis)
Meter: 8 7, 8 7, 8 7 7.
Unison, in moderate time
Music: XIII cent. Plainsong, Mode V,
Arranged by Ernest White 1899-
Text: Aurelius Prudentius, 348-413
Tr. St. 1-4, John Mason Neale, 1818-66
Tr. St. 5, Henry Williams Baker, 1821-77

A second tune for this song. Not quite as annoying to transcribe as the “first tune”.

The alto, tenor, and bass parts are composed entirely of dotted half notes, while the soprano part is alternating half and quarter notes, giving it a sort of woozy, sea shanty, kind of feel. Pleasant and sort of hypnotic to play.

Though, since it has 4 sharps for C instruments, it ends up having 6 sharps for b flat instruments, which is a little challenging. As a special bonus, if you listen closely at the beginning and the end of the song you can hear the clothes washer in the background.

Here’s the pdf of my arrangement: 017b.ServiceBookAndHymnal

Of the Father’s love begotten
Ere the worlds began to be,
He is Alpha and Omega,
He the source, the ending he,
Of the things that are, that have been,
And that future years shall see,
Evermore and evermore.

O that birth forever blessed,
When the Virgin full of grace,
By the Holy Ghost conceiving,
Bare the Saviour of our race,
And the Babe, the world’s Redeemer,
First revealed his sacred face,
Evermore and evermore.

This is he whom seers in old time
Chanted of with one accord,
Whom the voices of the prophets
Promised in their faithful word;
Now he shines, the long-expected;
Let creation praise its Lord,
Evermore and evermore.

O ye heights of heaven, adore him;
Angel hosts, his praises sing;
Powers, dominions, bow before him,
And extol our God and King;
Let no tongue on earth be silent,
Every voice in concert ring,
Evermore and evermore.

Christ, to thee, with God the Father,
And, O Holy Ghost, to thee,
Hymn and chant and high thanksgiving
Honor, glory, and dominion,
And eternal victory,
Evermore and evermore. Amen.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

06.27.2016.KillingTime

The band I’m in practices in the East Bay. After a couple horrible driving experiences, I’ve decided to take BART. One of my East Bay living fellow band mates usually picks me up at Ashby BART station on their way to practice.

Sometimes I get there early, or my bandmate is late, leaving me with some time to kill.

Exploring the station, I’ve discovered that there is a spiffy reverb filled underpass on the East side of the station.

Working up my courage, I’ve started playing my clarinet in the underpass.

I had a pleasant interaction with a blind woman towards the end of this video.

Next I need to figure out some way to record my hymns in the underpass. The natural reverb of the underpass is far superior to the electronic processing.

16.June.2016

When I get frustrated with my ability to play the “right” notes, I take some time off to play the “left” notes, instead.

When I was putting my bass clarinet together, I noticed that the sound of the keys closing was pretty cool and kind of similar to the sound of the African instrument called the Mbira.

So I recorded the keys closing as the percussion track for this tune. Now I just need to figure out how to use Audacity to make a loop out of it.

009.LutheranServiceBookAndHymnal

Lutheran Service Book and Hymnal Hymn number 9, aka “Prepare the Way, O Zion!” arranged for Soprano and Bass Clarinets.

MESSIAH.
7 6, 7 6, 7 7, 6 6.
In stately manner
Swedish Melody, XVII cent.
Frans Mikael Franzen, 1772-1847
Tr. Augustus Nelson, 1863-1949

This is a very “stately” hymn, with lots of very typically hymn-ish flourishes.

Definitely brings back memories of being in a drafty Wisconsin Lutheran Church.

Here’s the pdf of the arrangement: 009.ServiceBookAndHymnal

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal