068a.ChristianDostThouSeeThem

Please turn to number 68 (First Tune) and join with the clarinets in “Christian, Dost Thou See Them”.

Number: 68 (First Tune)
First Line: Christian, Dost Thou See Them
Name: GUTE BAUME BRINGEN.
Meter: 6 5, 6 5. D.
Tempo: With energy
Music: Praxis Pietatis Melica, Frankfurt, 1668
Text: Andrew of Crete, cir. 660-732
Tr. John Mason Neale, 1818-66

Clarinet Arrangement: 068.ChristianDostThouSeeThem

I had an urge to take this one slowly, with a melancholy feel. The text is kind of depressing and reminds me of the things I like least about Christianity. Lots of smiting, girding, battles, and intolerence for other faiths.

1 Christian, dost thou see them
on the holy ground,
how the pow’rs of darkness
rage thy steps around?
Christian, up and smite them,
counting gain but loss,
in the strength that cometh
by the holy cross.

2 Christian, dost thou feel them,
how they work within,
striving, tempting, luring,
goading into sin?
Christian, never tremble;
never be downcast;
gird thee for the battle,
watch and pray and fast.

3 Christian, dost thou hear them,
how they speak thee fair?
“Always fast and vigil?
Always watch and prayer?”
Christian, answer boldly,
“While I breathe I pray!”
Peace shall follow battle,
night shall end in day.

4 Hear the words of Jesus:
“O my servant true:
thou art very weary –
I was weary too;
but that toil shall make thee
some day all mine own,
and the end of sorrow
shall be near my throne.”

Praxis Pietatis Melica” was a German Hymnal:

Praxis pietatis melica (Practice of Piety in Song)[1] is a Protestanthymnal first published in the 17th century by Johann Crüger. The hymnal, which appeared under this title from 1647 to 1737 in 45 editions, has been described as “the most successful and widely-known Lutheran hymnal of the 17th century”.[2] Crüger composed melodies to texts that were published in the hymnal and are still sung today, including “Jesu, meine Freude“, “Herzliebster Jesu” and “Nun danket alle Gott“. Between 1647 and 1661, Crüger first printed 90 songs by his friend Paul Gerhardt, including “O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden“.

Andrew of Crete was an early Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic Saint.

Saint Andrew of Crete (Greek: Ἀνδρέας Κρήτης, c. 650 – July 4, 712 or 726 or 740), also known as Andrew of Jerusalem, was an 8th-century bishop, theologian, homilist,[1] and hymnographer. He is venerated as a saint by Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic Christians.

Today, Saint Andrew is primarily known as a hymnographer. He is credited with the invention (or at least the introduction into Orthodox liturgical services) of the canon, a new form of hymnody. Previously, the portion of the Matins serrains inserted between the scripture verses. Saint Andrew expanded these refrains into fully developed poetic Odes, each of which begins with the theme (Irmos) of the scriptural canticle, but then goes on to expound the theme of the feast being celebrated that day (whether the Lord, the Theotokos, a saint, the departed, etc.).

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal