122b – Come, Holy Spirit

Please turn your hymnals to number 122 (Second Tune) and join with the clarinets in “Come, Holy Spirit”.

Number: 122 (Second Tune)
First Line: Come, Holy Spirit, God and Lord
Name: PIXHAM.
Meter: L.M.
Tempo: Prayerfully
Music: Horatio W. Parker, 1863-1919
Text: Martin Luther, 1483-1546
Tr. Edward Traill Horn III, 1909-

Clarinet Arrangement: 122b-ComeHolySpirit

This is a really pleasant arrangement, one of the more “tuneful” hymns I’ve run across in a while. And, it’s no wonder, considering his bio!

Horatio William Parker (September 15, 1863 – December 18, 1919) was an American composer, organist and teacher. He was a central figure in musical life in New Haven, Connecticut in the late 19th century, and is best remembered as the undergraduate teacher of Charles Ives while the composer attended Yale University.

Before leaving New York City in 1893, Parker had completed his oratorio, Hora Novissima, set to the opening words of De contemptu mundi by Bernard of Cluny. It was widely performed in America; and also in England, in 1899 at Chester, and at the Three Choirs Festival at Worcester, the latter an honour never before paid an American composer.[6] European critics called it one of the finest of American compositions.[1] While he is mostly remembered for this single work, he was a prolific and versatile composer in a mostly conservative Germanic tradition, writing two operas, songs, organ and incidental music, and a copious quantity of works for chorus and orchestra. Influences in his compositions include Mendelssohn, Brahms, Wagner, as well as Debussy and Elgar in some works which he composed closer to 1900. During his lifetime he was considered to be the finest composer in the United States, a superior craftsman writing in the most advanced style.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal