106a-ComeYeFaithfulRaiseTheStrain

Please turn to number 106 (First Tune) and join with the clarinets in, “Come Ye Faithful, Raise the Strain”.

Number: 106 (First Tune)
First Line: Come Ye Faithful, Raise the Strain
Name: ST. KEVIN.
METER: 7 6, 7 6. D. Trochaic.
Tempo: With movement
Music: Arthur S. Sullivan, 1842-1900
Text: St. John of Damascus, VIII cent.
Tr. John Mason Neale, 1818-66 a.

Clarinet Arrangement: 106a-ComeYeFaithfulRaiseTheStrain

Regarding the author of the text, St John of Damascus.

 

Saint John of Damascus (Medieval Greek Ἰωάννης ὁ Δαμασκηνός, Ioánnis o Damaskinós, Byzantine Greek pronunciation: [ioˈanis o ðamasciˈnos]; Latin: Ioannes Damascenus), Arabic: يوحنا الدمشقي‎‎, ALA-LC: Yūḥannā ad-Dimashqī); also known as John Damascene and as Χρυσορρόας / Chrysorrhoas (literally “streaming with gold”—i.e., “the golden speaker”; c. 675 or 676 – 4 December 749) was a Syrian monk and priest. Born and raised in Damascus, he died at his monastery, Mar Saba, near Jerusalem.[1]

A polymath whose fields of interest and contribution included law, theology, philosophy, and music, he is said by some sources to have served as a Chief Administrator to the Muslim caliph of Damascus before his ordination.[2][3] He wrote works expounding the Christian faith, and composed hymns which are still used both liturgically in Eastern Christian practice throughout the world as well as in western Lutheranism at Easter.[4] He is one of the Fathers of the Eastern Orthodox church and is best known for his strong defense of icons.[5] The Catholic Church regards him as a Doctor of the Church, often referred to as the Doctor of the Assumption due to his writings on the Assumption of Mary.[6]

I thought that was some pretty cool history, then I realized that Arthur S. Sullivan was the “Sullivan” of “Gilbert & Sullivan”!

Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan MVO (13 May 1842 – 22 November 1900) was an English composer. He is best known for his series of 14 operatic collaborations with the dramatist W. S. Gilbert, including H.M.S. Pinafore, The Pirates of Penzance and The Mikado. His works comprise 23 operas, 13 major orchestral works, eight choral works and oratorios, two ballets, incidental music to several plays, and numerous hymns and other church pieces, songs, and piano and chamber pieces. The best known of his hymns and songs include “Onward Christian Soldiers” and “The Lost Chord”.

Red Service Book and Hymnal
Red Service Book and Hymnal

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *